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Help me design a cheap automatic door opener


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#31 Lou Apo

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 03:58 PM

Only issue I see is no sliding glass (that I saw) and looks to be for interior doors (doesn't look like it has the power to close an outdoor-door).

Other then that, I agree, for that price, you can't touch it even building it yourself. Heck, maybe it's on e-bay even cheaper!

--Dan


It is rated for the weight of an exterior door, but it would come down to how stiff your latch and weather stripping are. Worst case scenario is that you need to replace the latch and weather stripping with a style that has minimal resistance. Depending on the door that may be simple or very challenging.

#32 Chassmain

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 07:23 PM

It is rated for the weight of an exterior door, but it would come down to how stiff your latch and weather stripping are. Worst case scenario is that you need to replace the latch and weather stripping with a style that has minimal resistance. Depending on the door that may be simple or very challenging.


Great price, and an option that I evaluated in the past. What makes it a no go for me is the lack of manual operation. Most of the more expensive commercial door openers have some sort of hysteresis or electromagnetic clutch to disengage when it's not in operation. This automatic door opener has a large disclaimer to avoid manual use.

Great product, but no way I'll get the rest of the people in the house to ALWAYS hit the button and then wait for the door to open.

#33 Quixote_1

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 11:27 PM

and damn that thing is slow!

#34 jdale

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 12:28 AM

Here's a nice home-made implementation. Not sure if it ends up being cheap or not.
http://uiproductions...-trek-door.html

#35 Lou19

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 09:29 AM

If you want a safe pneumatic door, you must have the proper controls.
Air cylinders used improperly can cause great harm, so be careful!


Thanks,
Lou
Gentleman Door Automation LLC

#36 nirobi03

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 12:01 PM

Sorry... I know this was originally posted a very long time ago....

 

I was wondering if you ended up deciding on something?

 

 

I am very close to buying a product from www.autoslideofamerica.com... but I'm trying to accomplish this as inexpensively as possible....

 

 

I'm considering replicating this Autoslide product with a motor, rack gear, and an Arduino or Raspberry Pi.... I will be using a controller or Raspberry Pi even if I pay for the Autoslide product, so I can control this device remotely (will use it to open the door to let my dogs out, vs giving them an RFID reader or IR sensor and allowing the to come and go as they please...)  

 

Am I crazy for wanting to attack this project?



#37 ano

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 11:23 PM

Am I crazy for wanting to attack this project?

Depends how much your time is worth.  Like anything else. You can buy one and have it installed for none of your time, or build it cheaper for many hours of your time. You see these amazing creations that people create and show on the web, and how they only cost X or Y, but what is not included are the many many hours spent developing it.


Edited by ano, 16 August 2016 - 11:25 PM.


#38 nirobi03

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 10:38 AM

Depends how much your time is worth.  Like anything else. You can buy one and have it installed for none of your time, or build it cheaper for many hours of your time. You see these amazing creations that people create and show on the web, and how they only cost X or Y, but what is not included are the many many hours spent developing it.

100% agree!  It seems like a simple concept but I know if will take me many hours...  I wouldn't consider it, if it didn't sound like fun... I dont know why but this sounds like it would be fun to plan out and build (assuming I get it to work and dont just take the door off the hinges after losing my mind).



#39 Quixote_1

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 09:20 AM

I think what it comes down to is, what is your wife worth?  If you can save $1000 on the product and install, it may be worth the danger involved.



#40 ToniaBond

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 10:32 PM

Great tips.. Thanks for sharing






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