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Alarm Subpanel (keeping it neat with splice options)


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#16 Neurorad

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 07:39 PM

Replacing a controller with the same brand will probably be a fairly straightforward swap, without many changes - but using 'service loops' for your cables might be a good option, if you want to think 10 years ahead, and you're super paranoid.

Service loop = some extra slack, looped neatly (and/or stuffed into the wall ;))

#17 Work2Play

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 08:01 PM

As neuro said above - NEVER cut your wires too short! Especially with an in-wall can... it's so easy to pull a service-loop up in the attic... or I often even get the wires tied up nicely, then push the excess back into the wall cavity above the can - it looks perfectly neat that way and there's still a few feet above. But - in 10 years, there'll be a way to accomplish anything anyways - even if it means opening a hole in the wall and making some splices... anything is possible.

As for 66 blocks - as far as I recall, they're designed for solid wires... though many have used them for stranded anyways.

#18 daxiang28

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 08:37 PM

Service loops... awesome. Going to push the slack up into the attic.

#19 rockinarmadillo

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 03:55 AM

OK, I am convinced too. Going with service loops.

#20 Basildane

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 02:34 PM

Interesting discussion. I have been planning to use a 66 block for terminations. My reasoning is that in 10 years when I want to upgrade to a M100Platinum I can just change out the jumpers without worrying about the home run wiring being too short or too long. Am I missing something?


Simply leave extra wire in the wall behind the panel, when you change the panel in the future, your wire is there.
Having an extra break in the loop (66 block) does nothing but add a point of failure to the system.

I've had multiple failures, both telephone and security, that led back to a bad connection on an old 66 or 110 block.
We stopped using them over 10 years ago.

#21 gatchel

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 08:45 PM

There are other ways of future proofing with service loops and keeping it nice. Here is my recently added detatched garage "sub".

Attached File  CT Post 1.jpg   90.66K   103 downloads

Panduit is your friend.

#22 video321

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 09:56 PM

gatchel-
What's with the ground block in there?

#23 Work2Play

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 02:43 AM

Panduit is your friend.

So is drywall ^_^ You can hide a lot in the space above the panel!

#24 gatchel

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 08:08 AM

gatchel-
What's with the ground block in there?

The ground block is for landing the surge protection. The little black box above it is a data bus surge protector. There is one at each end where the wires enter the panel at the house and garage. It's a Ditek unit.
Right now there is only one unit, in the future there may be 3 or 4 devices to be grounded.


So is drywall ^_^ You can hide a lot in the space above the panel!


I hear you, cheaper too... This picture doesn't show it but the wires exiting the top of the panel are now going through a small stub of conduit into another Elk SWB-28. The "above the panel" placement wasn't an option for me any more. I wish it was, Panduit is NOT cheap :angry:

Edited by gatchel, 05 December 2011 - 08:19 AM.


#25 Work2Play

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 04:19 PM

I hear you, cheaper too... This picture doesn't show it but the wires exiting the top of the panel are now going through a small stub of conduit into another Elk SWB-28. The "above the panel" placement wasn't an option for me any more. I wish it was, Panduit is NOT cheap :angry:

Ah - yeah, I have something similar - with a 50" can I installed above the 20" that came with the house. But if you can pull excess up in the attic or above and out of sight that works great too. That's whay I

#26 DELInstallations

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 08:51 AM

Wondering why everyone here seems to always lay their Elk cards on the flat instead of using the SWG's? I don't really see the benefits other than being able to visually look at the boards. Seems like they negate the depth of the enclosure and take up 1/2 the width.

#27 gatchel

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 09:23 AM

Wondering why everyone here seems to always lay their Elk cards on the flat instead of using the SWG's? I don't really see the benefits other than being able to visually look at the boards. Seems like they negate the depth of the enclosure and take up 1/2 the width.


For me, It's more visually appealing. The wires can be kept low (back)in the can instead of floating out in the open. Sure, with the cards on the edge they can be wire tied together and neatened up a bit but I guess it's more of a personality thing. My house main panel 28" can has the relay expansion board on the edge and I don't like an plan on changing it at some point. The edge mounts also are looser fitting than the metal adapters with standoffs. Other than the down side of taking up more space, I say to each their own.

#28 DELInstallations

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 10:24 PM

So be it, I haven't had a problem with loose boards on the SWG's, and even on ones that had some play, it was easy to take care of by moving the SWG or slightly giving a small spin. I've had more issues with the push pins not securing properly for a lot of the plates.

I've found using ty-raps with screw mounts to be a nice saver, and then I tend to use either a modified method of cable lacing or taking out the safety wire pliers and bundling individual groups. I've also tended to allot more space on the edges for the larger bundles coming in to the panel and then sub-bundle from there prior to dressing out the panels.

#29 gatchel

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 09:18 PM


I've found using ty-raps with screw mounts to be a nice saver, and then I tend to use either a modified method of cable lacing or taking out the safety wire pliers and bundling individual groups.


For installations that I do at work, I agree. I also use screw mounts and Ty-wraps, tons of them. For the home I had to step it up a bit. I have friends that are in the industry and very, very critical. I didn't want to let them down. :)

#30 DELInstallations

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 09:22 PM

I've used the ty-raps with the mounts built in instead of the stickys, then if you want them to look closely, a nice cable lace job beats panduit.




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