Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Buying Glasses?


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#16 BraveSirRobbin

BraveSirRobbin

    Cocoonut

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7360 posts

Posted 03 February 2018 - 10:02 AM

iceverything

 

Can the PD cause your eyes to converge or diverge? I've had a problem with seeing double when my eyes get tired, especially when I look to the left and it began after a lens change. Can anything with the lens cause this?

 

Mike.

Did they change the 'base curve' also?  I know I've had problems getting a change in power (this base curve seems to be subjective or preference between OD's).  Of course, I'm not a doctor and just play one here on CT! :)



#17 pete_c

pete_c

    Cocoonut

  • -=Gold Supporter=-
  • 8284 posts
  • Location:House
  • Experience:average
  • Software:Main Lobby, Open Source Automation
  • Hardware:HAI OmniPro II, Mi Casa Verde Vera, Ocelot
  • Tech:X10-PLC, X10-RF, UPB, INSTEON, Z-Wave, ZigBee, 1-Wire, xAP, xPL, ALC
  • Audio:Russound
  • Video:MythTV
  • CCTV:analog, ip, dvr
  • Phone:Asterisk, FreePBX, Ooma, POTS, VoIP via ISP

Posted 03 February 2018 - 01:36 PM

Here is the Wiki relating to PD - the person I spoke to said to just use 64mm as a base if I do not measure it.

 

Measured three times here and looks to be 64mm.  One time asked wife to measure.

 

Pupillary distance


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pupillary distance (PD) or interpupillary distance (IPD) is the distance measured in millimeters between the centers of the pupils of the eyes. This measurement is different from person to person and also depends on whether they are looking at near objects or far away. Monocular refers to the distance between each eye and the bridge of the nose which may be slightly different for each eye due to anatomical variations. For people who need to wear prescription glasses consideration of monocular PD measurement by the optician helps to ensure that the lenses will be located in the optimum position. Purchasing glasses online can be a potential problem if the PD measurement isn't available. In both the UK and most of Canada (excluding British Columbia), the PD measurement is classed as a dispensing tool rather than a part of the actual prescription of the person whose eyes were tested, thus there is no obligation for a PD to be provided on patient request. Whilst PD is an optometric term used to specify prescription eyewear, IPD is more critical for the design of binocular viewing systems, where both eye pupils need to be positioned within the exit pupils of the viewing system. These viewing systems include binocular microscopes, night vision devices or goggles (NVGs), and head-mounted displays (HMDs). IPD data are used in the design of such systems to specify the range of lateral adjustment of the exit optics or eyepieces. IPD is also used to describe the distance between the exit pupils or optical axes of a binocular optical system. The distinction with IPD is the importance of anthropometric databases and the design of binocular viewing devices with an IPD adjustment that will fit a targeted population of users. Because instruments such as binoculars and microscopes can be used by different people, the distance between the eye pieces is usually made adjustable to account for IPD. In some applications, when IPD is not correctly set, it can lead to an uncomfortable viewing experience and eye strain.

 

Attached File  db.jpg   177.3K   2 downloads



#18 pete_c

pete_c

    Cocoonut

  • -=Gold Supporter=-
  • 8284 posts
  • Location:House
  • Experience:average
  • Software:Main Lobby, Open Source Automation
  • Hardware:HAI OmniPro II, Mi Casa Verde Vera, Ocelot
  • Tech:X10-PLC, X10-RF, UPB, INSTEON, Z-Wave, ZigBee, 1-Wire, xAP, xPL, ALC
  • Audio:Russound
  • Video:MythTV
  • CCTV:analog, ip, dvr
  • Phone:Asterisk, FreePBX, Ooma, POTS, VoIP via ISP

Posted 03 February 2018 - 01:52 PM

And a couple of articles from Consumer Reports:


8 Great Ways to Save on the Cost of Eyeglasses
Here’s how to shop smarter at every step of the process—without skimping on quality.

By Anthony Giorgianni
December 29, 2016

1. Study Up
It’s smart to research your choices, even before you have your eyes examined, so that you will know what to ask, understand your options better, and avoid being oversold on extras you don’t need.

There are many good online resources you can use to find information, including AllAboutVision.com, Eyeglasses.com, and LensesRx.com. Look for advice on choosing lenses, frames, and add-ons, such as anti-reflective coatings.

2. Talk to Your Eye Doctor
If your prescription is more than a year old, you’ll need a new eye exam, says James Wachter, an optometrist at Clarkson Eyecare in St. Louis. While at the doctor’s, ask for recommendations about which lenses and frames are right for you. For example, your ophthalmologist may recommend a certain type of progressive lens or a specific material for your lenses. Or he or she may advise you to avoid frames that can’t properly accommodate your prescription—rimless models that won’t look right with thick lenses, for instance, or frames that are too narrow to handle the multiple vision fields in progressive and other multifocal lenses.

Ask the doctor to measure what’s called your pupillary distance or PD (the distance between the center of each of your pupils) and include it on your prescription. You’ll need the PD (two for multifocal lenses) if you decide to order lenses online. Some eyewear websites give you instructions on how to measure it yourself, but Adam Gordon, O.D., a clinical associate professor of optometry at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, says that a professional will be able to do it more accurately. At least five states—Alaska, Arizona, Kansas, Massachusetts and New Mexico—require that doctors provide you with your PD. So when you book your exam, verify that your eye doctor will give it to you, advises Gordon. Some doctors charge extra for this service unless you’re ordering glasses from them. If your doctor won’t provide your PD or charges for it, consider going elsewhere. If you decide to pay for a PD measurement, Warby Parker will reimburse you up to $50 as long as you buy glasses from one of its outlets.

3. Explore Frames
If your doctor sells frames, start by trying on some from his or her selection. Make note of the brand, model, and size of the frames you like. Also record prices and details about the seller’s return policies and warranty. (You’ll need to know the cost of eyeglasses in order to comparison shop.)


4. Compare Your Options
Once you’ve narrowed the frame choices, use a web search to find and price your favorite pairs, which in most cases you’re likely to find online. Get the prices on lenses, too, when considering the cost of eyeglasses, so that you can compare. One potential shortcut: If your eye exam was at Costco, Sam’s Club, or Walmart and you find a frame you like at the same store, our survey results suggest that you’ll likely be satisfied if you simply go ahead and order your lenses there. The same goes for Warby Parker if you have a simple, single-vision prescription. If you don’t, you can probably find less expensive lenses elsewhere.

5. Negotiate
If you find better prices as you search, call or visit the store where you originally discovered your favorite frames and ask it to match your lowest price. When looking for the best deal on the cost of eyeglasses, it’s only fair to give the store the chance to reduce its price, especially if the staff spent time answering your questions. It may be worth paying more to deal with a professional in person, especially if you’re ordering multifocal lenses or have a strong prescription. And it’s good to support a local business you may need for frame adjustments later on. Finally, if you’re haggle-averse, you’re not alone. Relatively few of our survey respondents tried negotiating for a discount. But of those who did, nearly half were successful, and more than a quarter of them saved $100 or more.

6. Divide and Conquer
If a single retailer doesn’t provide everything you need, consider splitting up the process. You might have your eyes examined at your doctor’s office, take advantage of the savings you can get buying frames online, and have the lenses made at Costco or Walmart, for example.

7. Don’t Pay for Add-ons That Don’t Add Up
In our reader survey, half the respondents said they paid extra for scratch-resistant coatings, and 22 percent shelled out for coatings that offer ultraviolet protection.

But all plastic lenses already have an anti-scratch coating on the front of the lens, says Karl Citek, an optometry professor at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Ore. And most lenses nowadays completely protect wearers from harmful UV light from the sun without any add-ons. One more to skip: coatings that block blue light. The science connecting long-term exposure to blue light to damage to part of the retina is weak, says James Sheedy, Pacific University professor emeritus of optometry, who has studied the effect of blue light on the eyes. One add-on that he does say may be worth paying for is an anti-reflective coating. It reduces glare on the front and back of the lenses, making them easier to look through—especially at night—and also lets other people see your eyes better, he explains.

8. Consider Buying a Second Pair
It’s a good idea to order a backup in case your primary glasses break or are lost and you don’t want to be forced to pay extra to get another pair quickly.

How to Avoid Being Gouged When Buying Eyeglasses
Our exclusive reader survey reveals ways to get surprisingly great deals on frames and lenses

By Anthony Giorgianni
December 29, 2016

For the approximately 64 percent of Americans who wear them, prescription eyeglasses are part medical device and part fashion accessory. They correct your vision and, faster than you can say Jackie O or Harry Potter, help you tell the world how you’d like to be viewed, too.

Even a simple pair, however, can easily set you back hundreds of dollars. That’s especially true if you’re buying eyeglasses the old-fashioned way, at a doctor’s office or an eyewear chain—or if you have a complicated prescription. Online retailers offer ways to save, as do big-box stores, but you may get less hand-holding and a smaller selection of frames. The choices—and the trade-offs­—can be overwhelming.

That’s why we surveyed more than 91,000 readers and also shopped for glasses ourselves, online and in walk-in stores, to discover the pros and cons of different vendors. We interviewed eyeglass experts and eye doctors to get their best advice, too. What we learned is that where you get your glasses should depend on whether your priority is convenience, service, selection, or a rock-bottom price.

Doctors’ offices and independent eyeglass shops. Nearly 40 percent of survey respondents bought their glasses from one of these sources. They gave these sellers high marks for lens and frame fitting, employee knowledge, and follow-up service. But frames and lenses tended to cost more than elsewhere: Our readers shelled out a median of around $400, two to three times what you might pay online or at a discount store.

Major eyewear chains. Since it has many locations to help you if there’s a problem with your glasses, buying eyeglasses at an eyeglass chain can be convenient. Our readers reported good follow-up service from most chains, too. But in other areas, survey ratings varied depending on the company.

Warby Parker and Zenni Optical. Each of these stores sells only its own brand of glasses. Warby Parker retails both online (they’ll mail you up to five frames to try at home for free) and in brick-and-mortar locations in 18 states, the District of Columbia, and Ontario, Canada. In the seven years since it launched, Warby Parker has become a major player, offering glasses with single-vision lenses for $95, including an anti-reflective coating. But if you order progressive lenses, those prices can rocket to nearly $300—far more than the prices we found at some other retailers. And Warby Parker’s warranty on frames is only 30 days, compared with a full year at some other stores.

As for all-online retailer Zenni Optical, you can try on frames only virtually, by uploading a photo of yourself. And it, too, has a 30-day warranty. Still, Zenni’s frames with basic single-vision lenses start at less than $10, and upgrading to progressives begins at just $28. Survey respondents who bought from Zenni spent a median of just $69 for a complete pair of glasses, making them our survey’s lowest-cost retailer.

Large discount chains. Costco and Walmart are low-cost one-stop spots for buying eyeglasses where you can do everything from having your eyes examined to getting your finished glasses adjusted for fit. Frames can be inexpensive at these stores. At Walmart and Sam’s Club, we found basic, plastic progressive lenses for as little as $79. Costco charges $130 for high-definition progressive lenses, which, as with all Costco lenses, include an anti-reflective coating. That’s about half what you’d pay at many walk-in stores. But if you need basic, plastic single-vision lenses, you can pay as little as $29 at Walmart, about half as much as at Costco.

These retailers got high marks from readers, with Costco, our top-rated eyeglass retailer, edging out Walmart in several areas, including the quality of frames and lenses and follow-up service. But readers were not impressed by the selection of frames, especially at Costco. One workaround: You can usually have a discount store put lenses into frames you purchased elsewhere. Walmart charges an extra $10 and Costco $18 to do this. They’ll also adjust the frames while you’re there.

Online retailers. While only about 5 percent of our respondents bought their glasses online, nearly twice as many browsed online before purchasing at a walk-in store. Even if you don’t plan to buy from a website, the price information you get might help you negotiate your way to a discount from a walk-in store. For instance, in a web search, we found a Dolce & Gabbana men’s frame that was $190 at LensCrafters on sale for $99 at LensesRx Optical and $89 at Amazon.com.

But no matter how good an online retailer’s tools, prices, and return policies, getting your glasses by mail can be a hassle, especially if you have to send them back.

The Best Choice?

Once you know the pros and cons, your decision may be easy. If you have a simple prescription, you might consider shopping at Warby Parker. If you’re covered by insurance, you’ll probably want to choose a provider that accepts your plan. If your heart is set on pricey designer frames, online retailers may be a great option.

If no one retailer has the service, selection, convenience, and prices you want when buying glasses, think about splitting up the process. You might have your eyes examined by your doctor, search for frames online, and get your lenses from Costco. One eyeglass vendor doesn’t necessarily fit all—but knowing what each retailer offers will let you buy your glasses with your eyes wide open.


Your Guide to Buying Glasses Online
The number of people buying glasses from websites is small—but growing. We asked experts about what goes right, what goes wrong, and how to get what you want.

By Anthony Giorgianni
December 29, 2016


There’s no shortage of eye-care professionals who are skeptical about buying frames and lenses online. “These are custom-made devices. It’s not like buying a box of Cheerios,” explains Dr. Andrea Thau, an optometrist and president of the American Optometric Association. Prescription glasses, according to this camp, are complex medical devices—especially for people who need progressives or other multi-focal lenses, which require complicated measurements best taken while patients are wearing the frames they’ve selected. And once a pair of glasses is delivered, they say, the lenses should be checked to make sure the prescription is correct and the frames adjusted for fit.

But Stefanie Rodrigues, director of operations for Eyeglasses.com, thinks the main objection about buying glasses online isn’t really about the quality of glasses sold by online vendors but about the competition these vendors present to traditional eyeglass retailers. Most lenses, including progressives, are “not a big technical challenge for our lab,” she claims. When there is a problem, her company will remake the lenses at no extra charge. And, she adds, that doesn’t happen very often. “People think if they pay more, that means better vision. It doesn’t,” Rodrigues says.

But to make sure you’re really looking out for yourself when buying glasses online, follow these tips.

Research the website. Some online retailers, such as Warby Parker, Zenni Optical, and EyeBuyDirect, have top marks from the Better Business Bureau. Others don’t do so well, including EZContacts.com and GlassesUSA.com. Look for a report online at the Better Business Bureau (bbb.org). Also, see what others are saying by using a web search with the name of the company and terms like “reviews” and “complaints” before buying glasses online.

Resist buying frames you can’t try on. Many websites offer tools that let you test frames virtually by uploading a photo of your face. But trying on frames in the real, nonvirtual world is the only way to tell whether they’re comfortable and may give you a clue that they’re poorly made, says Adam Gordon, clinical professor of optometry at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Before buying glasses online, you can find frames locally or use a website that will let you try them on at home, like Glasses.com, which sells designer frames and will send you one pair of glasses to try for 15 days, complete with prescription lenses (single vision only).

Examine the return policy and warranty. A retailer’s policies are especially important when buying online, where typically you must pay for your glasses before you receive them. Find out if the online seller will remake your lenses if there’s a problem or error.

Enter your prescription carefully. All those numbers and unfamiliar terminology, such as “axis,” “sphere,” and “cylinder,” can make prescriptions complicated. It’s easy to blunder when transferring the data to a website form. Some retailers may ask you to upload an image of the prescription to avoid potential errors.

Check your vision. If you have difficulty seeing with your new glasses, ask the online retailer to verify that the lenses were created using the proper prescription. If that checks out, go back to your doctor, who can recheck the lenses and make sure a mistake wasn’t made during your examination.

Know when you need a pro. If the frames need adjustment, many websites provide instructions on doing the job yourself. But Gordon says it’s less risky to have a professional do it. Many walk-in retailers will adjust glasses purchased elsewhere, like if you bought your glasses online, though you may have to pay for this service.



#19 pete_c

pete_c

    Cocoonut

  • -=Gold Supporter=-
  • 8284 posts
  • Location:House
  • Experience:average
  • Software:Main Lobby, Open Source Automation
  • Hardware:HAI OmniPro II, Mi Casa Verde Vera, Ocelot
  • Tech:X10-PLC, X10-RF, UPB, INSTEON, Z-Wave, ZigBee, 1-Wire, xAP, xPL, ALC
  • Audio:Russound
  • Video:MythTV
  • CCTV:analog, ip, dvr
  • Phone:Asterisk, FreePBX, Ooma, POTS, VoIP via ISP

Posted 12 February 2018 - 11:47 AM

Just a quick follow up to this endeavor as I have never done this before.  Note here not including Ophthalmologist visit and checkup.

 

1 - purchased frames (decided on two different frames from wherever as they are all the same).  Running total ~ $25 each

Years ago would purchase subscription sunglasses and regular glasses - might go to that methodology again.

2 - shipped one eyeglass frame to Eyeglass Lens direct (Single Vision Polycarbonate Spherical Frame Type:Full Metal Frame) via USPS - running total -

 

One eyeglass frame  ==> $25.00

USPS click and ship ==>   $7.45

Eyeglass Direct ==>        $45.45  ($38.00 plus return shipping of $7.45)

========================

Total ==============> $77.90

 

3 - Got an ack to my glass frames on Friday 9th of February.

 

Hello Pete
The frame(s) for Order#: 12345 have been received. Orders typically require two weeks for processing. We'll be sure to notify you when the order has been completed and is ready to be shipped.
Please don't hesitate to contact us if you have any questions, we're here to help!
Sincerely,
Eyeglass Lens Direct

 

4 - clock ticking....



#20 ano

ano

    Cocoonut

  • Registered
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3217 posts
  • Location:AZ
  • Experience:guru
  • Hardware:HAI OmniPro II
  • Tech:UPB, ZigBee
  • Audio:HAI
  • Phone:Ooma

Posted 14 February 2018 - 12:10 PM

Keep us posted. I just had an eye exam so might get new glasses. I only us them for driving at night, so its not like they need to be the most fashionable.  I wore contact lens for distance when I was in my 30's and 40's, but since then my eyes have actually gotten better every time  have an eye test. I seem to now have one good distance eye and one good near vision eye, and brain seems to figure out the rest.



#21 pete_c

pete_c

    Cocoonut

  • -=Gold Supporter=-
  • 8284 posts
  • Location:House
  • Experience:average
  • Software:Main Lobby, Open Source Automation
  • Hardware:HAI OmniPro II, Mi Casa Verde Vera, Ocelot
  • Tech:X10-PLC, X10-RF, UPB, INSTEON, Z-Wave, ZigBee, 1-Wire, xAP, xPL, ALC
  • Audio:Russound
  • Video:MythTV
  • CCTV:analog, ip, dvr
  • Phone:Asterisk, FreePBX, Ooma, POTS, VoIP via ISP

Posted 14 February 2018 - 02:06 PM

BTW did you ask your Ophthalmologist for a PD measurement with your eyeglass script?

 

Here wore contacts in the 60's to the 90's then went back to glasses.  

 

Many family members did the Radial keratotomy (RK) and later they did the Lasik surgery over the years.

 

I do not wear reading glasses nor need them at this time.  Wife does.

 

I can drive during the day without my glasses but need them at night to drive and use them on and off to watch the LCD TV but typically do not wear the glasses in the house.



#22 ano

ano

    Cocoonut

  • Registered
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3217 posts
  • Location:AZ
  • Experience:guru
  • Hardware:HAI OmniPro II
  • Tech:UPB, ZigBee
  • Audio:HAI
  • Phone:Ooma

Posted 14 February 2018 - 04:11 PM

Yes got the prescription, as I have been getting in the habit doing that. They never seem to mind since you are paying for the eye exam.  Actually my United Healthcare will pay for an exam once every two years for the primary doctor co-pay, which is nice, the first time I've had that.  My former BCBS didn't but each plan is different.

 

I haven't had RK or Lasik, but I do actually track the numbers of these in my job.  I can tell you there is may subtypes of these, and many people are happy with them, but a large number are not happy.  The number of people having these peaked several years back, and they have been less in favor recently more.  Still popular, but less so than in the past. What worries me is vision changes over time, so new glasses or contacts is not a big deal, but changing the surgery is not so easy. You may need glasses to correct these in some cases.



#23 pete_c

pete_c

    Cocoonut

  • -=Gold Supporter=-
  • 8284 posts
  • Location:House
  • Experience:average
  • Software:Main Lobby, Open Source Automation
  • Hardware:HAI OmniPro II, Mi Casa Verde Vera, Ocelot
  • Tech:X10-PLC, X10-RF, UPB, INSTEON, Z-Wave, ZigBee, 1-Wire, xAP, xPL, ALC
  • Audio:Russound
  • Video:MythTV
  • CCTV:analog, ip, dvr
  • Phone:Asterisk, FreePBX, Ooma, POTS, VoIP via ISP

Posted 17 February 2018 - 11:38 AM

Received an ACK that my glasses are being shipped on Friday, February 16, 2018.  I also got an ACK when the glass frames were received on February 9, 2018.  Good time frame.

 

I like that the eyeglass frames were shipped to in hard eyeglass cases.  It's been maybe 20 years now that I have seen this as it turned in to an extra option over the years.

 

Dealing with a company called Eye Glass Lens Direct for Single Vision Polycarbonate Spherical.  Eye glass frames were metal and came with a magnetic polarized clip on sunglass cover.  (which I have used now for about 20 years).

 

Relating to frames they came from Modenti Optical Group Company which appears to be a parent company for a few different names.

 

Note too that any designer named frames were $80.00 up and saw a few at $300.00.

 

Yeah here BCBS covers one eye exam a year.  That said everything associated with the eye exam is a la carted bringing the cost upwards of $400 and BCBS covering less than 50 % of those costs.  Well now too a blood exam is a la carted to pieces of what is being checked.  (kind of willy nilly playing with numbers practices). 

 

The optional (which we always had) eyeglass insurance is good for once a year new glasses at a discount (which really isn't much at all).

 

February 20, 2018

 

Received glasses today.  The glasses work and look well made.  I am a happy camper.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users