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Cylindrical Lock Electric Strike


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#1 auzzzie

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Posted 24 July 2018 - 11:19 AM

Gents,

 

I'm attempting to put an electric door strike/keypad setup on my garage. Currently it has a standard cylindrical lock (no key) and a deadbolt above it. 

 

I'm not much of a locksmith but if I put an electric strike on the deadbolt that's not going to work as the deadbolt wouldn't retract. 

If I put one on the cylindrical lock, couldn't you just turn the handle to bypass it? 

 

Do I need to change out my lock hardware for an electric strike to work? 

 

Appreciate any input. 



#2 42etus

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Posted 24 July 2018 - 02:32 PM

You are correct. It won't work on the deadbolt. You will need to install a appropriate lockset (keyed) to make use of the door strike.



#3 mikefamig

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 08:52 AM

This looks like a nice small strike. It was recommended to me by Delinstallations for my garage walk-in door but I haven't installed one yet.

 

http://www.trineonli...3000_series.php

 

Mike.



#4 facesnorth

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Posted 31 July 2018 - 11:02 PM

I'm interested in this topic as well.  I actually recently bought the Trine as it looked like a good option and I wanted to have it on hand to see what I'd need to do to make it work with my doors.  However, I haven't decided what kind of "handle" or knob to use yet.  As this is my front door, I still want it to look fairly nice.  I guess it's irrelevant whether it is keyed or not.

 

However, like others have observed, I would not be able to use a deadbolt, or else the strike wouldn't work anyway.  Unless it was only used when we are home (and don't want anyone to come in via the strike).



#5 mikefamig

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 08:05 AM

The door strike is convenient but the trade off is a less secure door. You also need to consider fire safety and whether to use a "fail safe" or a "fail secure" strike. I did some reading on the topic a while back but forget what conclusions I came to. Maybe others here can help.

 

Mike.



#6 mikefamig

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 08:31 AM

Here is a link to a discussion on door strikes that might help.

 

http://cocoontech.co...r strike fire



#7 lanbrown

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 06:43 PM

The door strike is convenient but the trade off is a less secure door. You also need to consider fire safety and whether to use a "fail safe" or a "fail secure" strike. I did some reading on the topic a while back but forget what conclusions I came to. Maybe others here can help.

 

Mike.

 

It would be a fail secure strike used here as long as the lock itself could be opened on the inside; how your typical house locks works these days.  The electric striker plate is only used when you're outside and you enter a valid access code.  When you're inside, you can just turn the knob and out you go.  So fail secure would make more sense.  If there was a fire, the lock setup works like a traditional lock setup.



#8 mikefamig

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Posted 03 August 2018 - 05:14 PM

It would be a fail secure strike used here as long as the lock itself could be opened on the inside; how your typical house locks works these days.  The electric striker plate is only used when you're outside and you enter a valid access code.  When you're inside, you can just turn the knob and out you go.  So fail secure would make more sense.  If there was a fire, the lock setup works like a traditional lock setup.

 
Yeah that is how i understand it but I'm a self taught installer and don't advise on  code or safety stuff.
 
Mike

Edited by mikefamig, 03 August 2018 - 05:21 PM.


#9 ano

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Posted 03 August 2018 - 05:24 PM

When I did all the locks in my past house, I used deadbolts, not door strikes. The door strikes just aren't all that secure, the deadbolts are.  But since they were deadbolts, they had to be "fail safe" as I had an "exit" button inside that had to be pushed to exit.  I also had battery backup for about 8 hours, and a way to disconnect it from outside, should I need to.  I don't remember the circumstances now, but one day I did get locked out.  So I had to go up to the attic and remove the battery, then remove power to the house to get it.  For me, having the deadbolt security with a backup to get in, was better than having the insecure door strikes that are "fail secure."






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