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#16 pete_c

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 07:12 PM

When you bring up the browser for the first time Firefox will ask you to create an account to log in to it so that your browsing history and your links are replicated across different devices and OS's.  Same when using Microsoft IE. Here just replicate my links (exporting and importing them) to my desktops and laptops.  I go to the same websites (well like Cocoontech for example).  Relating to forums thinking I am a member of less than 10 forums including a couple of automotive forums.



#17 realolman

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 04:03 PM

Thanks to everyone who responded.  
I have a few questions.
 
I never log into anything as in user name and password unless I have to ... so just browsing using firefox without any kind of "official" log in enables Microsoft edge to put what I looked at on their browser as part of "My Feed"?!?  I checked a chart for salt concentrations and soon got ads for saltwater swimming pools.and this has nothing to do with my computer or operating system or ISP??
 
How far does this go?   Is it just ads?    I just looked at my bank stuff a bit ago.    My wife did something with Social Security on a legitimate web site and shortly we got a phone call from a scammer regarding Social Security.  How in the world would that occur?  you would think a site like that would be secure.
 
and a sort of sub question... how far is this legal?
 
thank you

Edited by realolman, 30 April 2019 - 04:07 PM.


#18 pete_c

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 04:15 PM

Best to read this about DNS in general.
 
Domain Name System
 
and then read this:
 
DNS hijacking
 
A number of consumer ISPs such as AT&T, Cablevision's Optimum Online, CenturyLink, Time Warner, Cox Communications, RCN, Rogers,  Charter Communications, Plusnet, Verizon,  Sprint, T-Mobile US, Virgin Media, Frontier Communications, Bell Sympatico, UPC, T-Online, Optus, Mediacom, ONO, TalkTalk, Bigpond (Telstra), TTNET, Türksat, and Telkom Indonesia use DNS hijacking for their own purposes, such as displaying advertisements or collecting statistics. Dutch ISPs XS4ALL and Ziggo use DNS hijacking by court order: they were ordered to block access to The Pirate Bay and display a warning page instead. These practices violate the RFC standard for DNS (NXDOMAIN) responses, and can potentially open users to cross-site scripting attacks.

The concern with DNS hijacking involves this hijacking of the NXDOMAIN response. Internet and intranet applications rely on the NXDOMAIN response to describe the condition where the DNS has no entry for the specified host. If one were to query the invalid domain name (for example www.example.invalid), one should get an NXDOMAIN response – informing the application that the name is invalid and taking the appropriate action (for example, displaying an error or not attempting to connect to the server). However, if the domain name is queried on one of these non-compliant ISPs, one would always receive a fake IP address belonging to the ISP. In a web browser, this behavior can be annoying or offensive as connections to this IP address display the ISP redirect page of the provider, sometimes with advertising, instead of a proper error message. However, other applications that rely on the NXDOMAIN error will instead attempt to initiate connections to this spoofed IP address, potentially exposing sensitive information.

Examples of functionality that breaks when an ISP hijacks DNS:

  •     Roaming laptops that are members of a Windows Server domain will falsely be led to believe that they are back on a corporate network because resources such as domain controllers, email servers and other infrastructure will appear to be available. Applications will therefore attempt to initiate connections to these corporate servers, but fail, resulting in degraded performance, unnecessary traffic on the Internet connection and timeouts.

 

  •     Many small office and home networks do not have their own DNS server, relying instead on broadcast name resolution. Many versions of Microsoft Windows default to prioritizing DNS name resolution above NetBIOS name resolution broadcasts; therefore, when an ISP DNS server returns a (technically valid) IP address for the name of the desired computer on the LAN, the connecting computer uses this incorrect IP address and inevitably fails to connect to the desired computer on the LAN. Workarounds include using the correct IP address instead of the computer name, or changing the DhcpNodeType registry value to change name resolution service ordering.

 

  •     Browsers such as Firefox no longer have their 'Browse By Name' functionality (where keywords typed in the address bar take users to the closest matching site).

 

  •     The local DNS client built into modern operating systems will cache results of DNS searches for performance reasons. If a client switches between a home network and a VPN, false entries may remain cached, thereby creating a service outage on the VPN connection.

 

  •     DNSBL anti-spam solutions rely on DNS; false DNS results therefore interfere with their operation.

 

  •     Confidential user data might be leaked by applications that are tricked by the ISP into believing that the servers they wish to connect to are available.

 

  •     User choice over which search engine to consult in the event of a URL being mistyped in a browser is removed as the ISP determines what search results are displayed to the user; functionality of applications like the Google Toolbar does not work correctly.

 

  •     Computers configured to use a split tunnel with a VPN connection will stop working because intranet names that should not be resolved outside the tunnel over the public Internet will start resolving to fictitious addresses, instead of resolving correctly over the VPN tunnel on a private DNS server when an NXDOMAIN response is received from the Internet. For example, a mail client attempting to resolve the DNS A record for an internal mail server may receive a false DNS response that directed it to a paid-results web server, with messages queued for delivery for days while retransmission was attempted in vain.

 

  •     It breaks Web Proxy Autodiscovery Protocol (WPAD) by leading web browsers to believe incorrectly that the ISP has a proxy server configured.

 

  •     It breaks monitoring software. For example, if one periodically contacts a server to determine its health, a monitor will never see a failure unless the monitor tries to verify the server's cryptographic key.

 

  • In some cases, the ISPs provide subscriber-configurable settings to disable hijacking of NXDOMAIN responses. Correctly implemented, such a setting reverts DNS to standard behavior. Other ISPs, however, instead use a web browser cookie to store the preference. In this case, the underlying behavior is not resolved: DNS queries continue to be redirected, while the ISP redirect page is replaced with a counterfeit DNS error page. Applications other than web-browsers cannot be opted out of the scheme using cookies as the opt-out targets only the HTTP protocol, when the scheme is actually implemented in the protocol-neutral DNS system.

 

Browser hijacking

 

Browser hijacking is a form of unwanted software that modifies a web browser's settings without a user's permission, to inject unwanted advertising into the user's browser. A browser hijacker may replace the existing home page, error page, or search engine with its own. These are generally used to force hits to a particular website, increasing its advertising revenue.

Some browser hijackers also contain spyware, for example, some install a software keylogger to gather information such as banking and e-mail authentication details. Some browser hijackers can also damage the registry on Windows systems, often permanently.

Some browser hijacking can be easily reversed, while other instances may be difficult to reverse. Various software packages exist to prevent such modification.

Many browser hijacking programs are included in software bundles that the user did not choose, and are included as "offers" in the installer for another program, often included with no uninstall instructions, or documentation on what they do, and are presented in a way that is designed to be confusing for the average user, in order to trick them into installing unwanted extra software.

There are several methods that browser hijackers use to gain entry to an operating system. Email attachments and files downloaded through suspicious websites and torrents are common tactics that browser hijackers use.



#19 pete_c

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 07:20 PM

Why We Can't Break Up With Big Tech

 

February 10, 20197:27 AM ET

 

 

 



#20 mikefamig

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 11:30 PM

When you bring up the browser for the first time Firefox will ask you to create an account to log in to it so that your browsing history and your links are replicated across different devices and OS's.  Same when using Microsoft IE. Here just replicate my links (exporting and importing them) to my desktops and laptops.  I go to the same websites (well like Cocoontech for example).  Relating to forums thinking I am a member of less than 10 forums including a couple of automotive forums.

 
I don't understand. I've never signed in to a browser. Windows 10 will have you sign in to Microsoft unless you create and use a "local user". I know that you use Ubuntu, is the same thing happening with Firefox there?
 
Mike.
 

Edited by mikefamig, 30 April 2019 - 11:32 PM.


#21 pete_c

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 11:36 PM

is the same thing happening with Firefox there?

 

Yes first time (or reset) you run Firefox in Windows or Ubuntu you are invited to create a user id and login to Firefox in the cloud.

 

 

Attached File  FirefoxLogin.jpg   36.8K   3 downloads



#22 pete_c

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 07:14 AM

Really the only solution is to ignore and accept it or not use the internet.

 

Here shut off my cell phones unless I am using them and do not partcipate on any social web sites.  You do have a choice still today.



#23 mikefamig

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 07:30 AM

Really the only solution is to ignore and accept it or not use the internet.

 

Here shut off my cell phones unless I am using them and do not partcipate on any social web sites.  You do have a choice still today.

 

I guess that I've just ignored it and hardly noticed it because I'm so used to opting out of so much stuff when installing software. Just saying no has become a habit and I've never subscribed to any cloud services other than one-drive and I have nothing stored there.

 

Mike.



#24 LarrylLix

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 08:10 AM

I guess that I've just ignored it and hardly noticed it because I'm so used to opting out of so much stuff when installing software. Just saying no has become a habit and I've never subscribed to any cloud services other than one-drive and I have nothing stored there.

 

Mike.

Check your router for the DNS it is using. No matter what software you may use, your router is set to connect to a specific DNS that can memorise or report every lookup you make. Google lives by advertising money and they are the major advertiser on almost every website. The websites just rent the page space to Google advertisers, for money.

 

Duckduckgo may not track you but they may sell your info  to somebody else that will. They need to make profits also or they wouldn't exist. I use it too but it hasn't made any difference in the last 6 months of usage.

 

Google is Skynet. Just confess to your wife and children that you watch porn online and forget about  it. :)


Edited by LarrylLix, 01 May 2019 - 08:12 AM.


#25 pete_c

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 08:41 AM

That is why I endorse / suggest the use of PFSense or any available freeware software firewall / router combo's out there.
 
The ISP modem is another router in front of your home router with open source encrypted firmware these days which you cannot see or manage.

#26 LarrylLix

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 08:53 AM

It doesn't matter what software you use, your browser has to use a DNS service.
Something has to change your URL to an IP address and whatever DNS software you use to gather a database, it still has to get the information from another DNS service. I doubt you are typing IP addresses into your browser.



#27 mikefamig

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 10:04 AM

Check your router for the DNS it is using. No matter what software you may use, your router is set to connect to a specific DNS that can memorise or report every lookup you make. Google lives by advertising money and they are the major advertiser on almost every website. The websites just rent the page space to Google advertisers, for money.
 
Duckduckgo may not track you but they may sell your info  to somebody else that will. They need to make profits also or they wouldn't exist. I use it too but it hasn't made any difference in the last 6 months of usage.
 
Google is Skynet. Just confess to your wife and children that you watch porn online and forget about  it. :)

 
I can not change my dns because my isp uses it to deliver programming info to my iptv television set top box. When I cahnge the dns addresses my program listings stop working. I would need to set up my own router/firewall inside their router/firewall for my personal use. I may do that one day but haven't yet.
 
Mike.
 

Edited by mikefamig, 01 May 2019 - 10:05 AM.


#28 mikefamig

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 10:10 AM

It doesn't matter what software you use, your browser has to use a DNS service.
Something has to change your URL to an IP address and whatever DNS software you use to gather a database, it still has to get the information from another DNS service. I doubt you are typing IP addresses into your browser.

 

I hear ya now, no matter what dns service you use you have the same snooping. For all of the time and effort we put into trying to attain some privacy I have accepted that it is a waste of time. The ISP and marketing forces on the net own us as long as we use the internet, drive a car, watch TV or turn on almost any electronic device we have little privacy. Privacy is a thing of the past unless you can go off the grid and that's not an option for me.

 

Mike



#29 mikefamig

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 10:22 AM

I have a question regarding vpn. If vpn disguised my IP address then the only way that I can see a web site targeting my pc for ads is to put cookies on my computer. I use vpn and I also wipe my browser clean almost daily.

 

My question is what other method is used to track me. If I use vpn and wipe the browser and cookies clean daily how will I be tracked? And doesn't vpn hide my ip address from the dns server as well as the web servers that I browse to or through. I am using Ccleaner and it cleans a load of info from the computer.

 

Mike.



#30 LarrylLix

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 10:22 AM

I hear ya now, no matter what dns service you use you have the same snooping. For all of the time and effort we put into trying to attain some privacy I have accepted that it is a waste of time. The ISP and marketing forces on the net own us as long as we use the internet, drive a car, watch TV or turn on almost any electronic device we have little privacy. Privacy is a thing of the past unless you can go off the grid and that's not an option for me.

 

Mike

:(

Looking into pfSense I can see a small value in running your own DNS server. After you initially get all the info from the big snoop DNS servers very little external (forwarding) requests should need to be made.

So now when you access some URL to buy a new car you should be using the cached entry in your own DNS database instead of GoogleSnoopDog knowing you are looking again. 

Of course the first time you access a new domain they got you again and your DNS database would get out of date quickly. Most of these websites move around like stores in the shopping malls with massive rent hikes.






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