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CQC Media Control 1

Mike

Senior Member
There was no CQC specific area in the marketplace so I'm throwing it out here

I was looking at the price list for CQC and saw Media Control 1 (CQSL-MC1) which says it:

CQSL Media Control adds the capability for control of an external media library such as a Sony DVD changer, a Kenwood DVD changer, an Axonix media server, or a Kaleidescape media server. Repository information is stored by CQC with this option. Prerequisite: CQSL-AC1 Caveats - Introductory pricing, complete functionality in CQC Version 1.6 (coming soon).

Now this is the setup of this functionality with the hardware server itself? I'm assuming the base software package would be able to control the devices as well, and this is some other custom integration.

Is that accurate?
 

Dean Roddey

Senior Member
We have a set of hardware-based systems coming up. These are based on the A-Tech cases, so they are very attractive, and they have the CQSL logo etched on the front panel. They will come with a full CQC software license.

The basic system will be avaliable first and will basically this:

- 8 digital I/O
- 4 IR zones (each can be a sensor or blaster)
- 2 40GB drives in a RAID 1 configuration for redundancy
- Can also do a solid state configuration if you want
- 256MB of memory (for straight automation 256 is enough)
Whatever is a recent good performance, high quality Motherboard/CPU, far more than sufficient for the job.
- Of course the usual onboard audio, video, ethernet, usb

This will be the core system, which is oriented towards straight automation. There are slots free, so more IR and I/O can be added if needed.

Built on top of that will be the MC-1, which will crank the drives to whatever is the latest high capacity, reliable drives. Only music will be on disk, so they don't need to be really fast and loud. They'll be in the 300GB to 400GB'ish range, again in a RAID1 configuration for redundancy since super-high speed isn't an issue.

So it'll be both an automation controller and media manager. It'll work via external changers or media servers for movie content, though it will require a driver. We'll start with the Sony 777 changer, then add others. It will include our own ripping support for music, and meta data retreival for music and movies. The meta data will be stored on-disk and will work for the DVDs in the changer. It will not be the all-seeing music repository that supports 15 different audio formats. It'll be designed for simplicity and ease of use, so it'll probably at first just support one lossless and one lossy codec, maybe the same codec (e.g. WMA.)

We can also do a RAID5 configuration if you want, though it's probably not warranted just for music. We didn't go for a super-compact enclosure for the pure automation system so that we can build the MC-1 and AC-1 on the exact same chassis and configuration.

Subsequently, probably 1.7, we will also provide, for those folks who want to do so, an outboard enclosure, also from A-Tech so it'll be a nice matched system, for a multi-terrabyte movie repository. We cannot support ripping for these for legal reasons, but we'll still be providing meta data retrieval for that data. In the meantime, if you want to set up your own movie repository, that's certainly doable. As long as there is a way to get to the meta data, such as via DVD Profiler, we can support such repositories. It just needs a driver. We'll get a DVD Profiler driver out soon. I've already looked at it and it won't be too terribly hard. It just needs some way to indicate where the actual files are.
 

Mike

Senior Member
Ok so it focuses on the additional hardware on top of that package. The CQC software will control the changers if you use your own pc hardware. This is what I thought, it makes sense.

Thanks.
 

upstatemike

Senior Member
Dean Roddey said:
The basic system will be avaliable first and will basically this:

- 8 digital I/O
- 4 IR zones (each can be a sensor or blaster)
- 2 40GB drives in a RAID 1 configuration for redundancy
- Can also do a solid state configuration if you want
- 256MB of memory (for straight automation 256 is enough)
Whatever is a recent good performance, high quality Motherboard/CPU, far more than sufficient for the job.
- Of course the usual onboard audio, video, ethernet, usb

This will be the core system, which is oriented towards straight automation. There are slots free, so more IR and I/O can be added if needed.
Just curious what you are using for the digital I/O and what the maximum available inputs will be? Also what are the pros and cons of using onboard I/O vs say the I/O in an ELK panel via some sort of interface?
 

upstatemike

Senior Member
Dean Roddey said:
We'll start with the Sony 777 changer, then add others.
I don't think the DVP-CX777ES can play both sides of a 2-sided disk. How about supporting the Sony DVP-CX875P?

It'll be designed for simplicity and ease of use, so it'll probably at first just support one lossless and one lossy codec, maybe the same codec (e.g. WMA.)
From what I've read, MP3 is probably still the leading lossy format and I think the most popular lossless codec is FLAC.
 

Dean Roddey

Senior Member
Just curious what you are using for the digital I/O and what the maximum available inputs will be?

There are lots of PCI-based I/O boards out there, primarily targeting the industrial world of course but they are just as applicable to home automation. We are looking at a couple of them. The maximum inboard I/O will be limited to the number on the board times the slots avalable. So it's never going to be able to offer 200 I/O on board or anything. At some point you'll move outboard.

Also what are the pros and cons of using onboard I/O vs say the I/O in an ELK panel via some sort of interface?

We just want to provide a system that can handle a reasonable amount of I/O, likely to be found in a small to mid-sized system, without having to use any outboard devices. But, if you have an Elk, then you'd probably want to buy it without the I/O board and just use the I/O on the Elk since it's got plenty and you've already paid for it and CQC can control that I/O just fine.

The purpose of this system's configuratin is to match something along the lines of a medium sized Crestron system in terms of ports available out of an appliance style box, since custom installers want that.
 
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