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ds10a sensor question

tbrad

Member
I've got several ds10a sensors left over from a security system installation and there are all sorts of things I'd like to do with them but didn't know how to do it without the security console. None of the projects I have in mind have anything to do with security so I figured it wasn't possible until I ran across a few threads on here about imaginative ways to use them that evidently didn't involve the security console. Great!

Then I ran across this from a post in October 2004:

"Edit: Please note that these sensors can only be used with the W800Rf32 receiver or one of the x10 all-in-one security panels. You cannot receive the signals using any other computer interface (at the time of this post... that I am aware of)"

Couple of questions:

1. Is this still applicable? I'm using a Powerlinc USB controller and v572a transceiver - will this work or do I specifically need a w800rf32?

2. What kind of signal does the ds10a send that is received by the w800? Is it an x10 signal on a house/unit code (don't think so)?

Thanks again for all your help!

Thomas
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
In short, the only way I know of receiving a DS10a signal (outside of the original X-10 security console) is to use the W800 RF receiver from WGL Designs. You will also need software for this such as HomeSeer.

The Elk will receive W800 signals natively (i.e w/o using a computer) also.

The DS10a does not send your typical X-10 house and unit code and must be synced up with what ever method you are using to receive the signals on initial setup (i.e. so only that device can "see" its secure code).

This is what makes the DS10a "secure" over a typical X-10 type transmitting device!
 

ver0776

Active Member
I too had a v572 that got retired to make way for the W800RF soley because I wanted to use DS10As. It IS worth it, sell or donate that V572. The one thing I miss is that since I am not using an ELK, when my automation software stops, my PalmPads break, where the 572 would keep working. The W800 will get the signals to the automation system MUCH faster than the 572 also.

When you install the sensor, you press a button that generates a code (0-32768 I think) and that is the replacement for the X10 code. It makes keeping it in sync with your home automation system a little more difficult than static addressed devices, but it is not that bad. I guess the batteries last a long time in them.

For a retrofit, they are awesome and CHEAP. ($5 each)

My house must be like 1,400 sqr. feet and I have over 20 DS10As up now... =) Overkill, but they are fun.

Vaughn
 

tbradnc

Member
I'll be back for more info when my w800 gets here tommorrow. ;-)

I'm particuarly interested in how the w800 reads the code from the ds10a but it'll probably make more sense when I have it all here and can play with it.

Thanks
Thomas
 

Quixote

Member
Girder 4 can use the W800. You can trigger anything you want with the signal if you have the right equipment. An example would be turning on a closet light when you open the door, and off again once it's closed.
 

kwilcox

Active Member
Home Control Assistant has complete support for the DS10A via the W800RF as well. I use a bunch of them as their range is greater than a typical hawkeye.
 

Quixote

Member
That How to is really cool. I'm going to build that for my W800 as soon as I can find the parts. Can you show us a diagram of how it should be, rather than how it shouldn't? I'm a little confused as to how one would make it so that the coax doesn't go through the antenna.

Thanks.
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
Quixote said:
I'm a little confused as to how one would make it so that the coax doesn't go through the antenna.
I just meant that when you hang the antenna, make sure the coax cable is routed up, away from the legs (i.e. you don't want to route the coax "thru" any of the legs).

A good way would be to mount the coax along a roof beam, then down and let the antenna hang from the coax end.
 

Quixote

Member
ok, I understand now. Thanks for clearing that up. I think what I'm going to do is cut a piece of acryllic to mount the legs on, then drill a hole in the center to bring the coax through and down to the antenna. Maybe I'll post some pics when I get around to building it.

Thanks again.
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
Quixote said:
ok, I understand now. Thanks for clearing that up. I think what I'm going to do is cut a piece of acryllic to mount the legs on, then drill a hole in the center to bring the coax through and down to the antenna. Maybe I'll post some pics when I get around to building it.

Thanks again.
Not sure I follow this, a pic might help.
 

Quixote

Member
Sorry - one last question - Wouldn't copper be better for radio wave reception instead of brass? It would be easier to find as well.
 
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