Gas Cutoff Valves for Home Automation

Spanky

Senior Member
ELK Products, Inc. has a water cutoff valve, ELK-WSV, for controlling the water supply in a home or business in case of a water leak or draining pipes in the winter.

Is there a need for a Natural Gas Cutoff Valve for automation control?

The Gas Cutoff Valve could turn off the gas in the case of a fire or detected gas leak.

It could incorporate a seismic detector to cut off the gas after an earth quake. This feature is required in some states.

It could have a lightning detector to detect a direct lightning strike into the gas line. Lightning can burn a hole in the flexible gas lines that are widely used in homes now. Such a hole can turn into a blow torch, burning down the house.

The system could be wireless or hardwired.

If you have any feelings on a gas cutoff valve, now is the time to speak up! :rolleyes:
 

Sacedog

Active Member
I agree with rfdesq. There is a need for something like this in CA. I too prefer a wired version.
 

Digger

Senior Member
I think that this would be an excellent addition to your product line! Both a natural gas and a propane version might be best.
 

politics123

Active Member
Note that these are likely to be expensive.
Name something that isn't these days... :rolleyes:
So, I was thinking something on the order of AA's explosive proof valve: $920.

If somewhat more reasonable, I think this is an excellent safety mechanism. I'd hook it up with a bunch of CO detectors, also. A few considerations, though: does your furnace/fireplace/stove/oben include an electric lighter or a pilot light. -- this would make resuming the supply a bit more dangerous
 

Digger

Senior Member
Note that these are likely to be expensive.
Name something that isn't these days... :rolleyes:
So, I was thinking something on the order of AA's explosive proof valve: $920.

If somewhat more reasonable, I think this is an excellent safety mechanism. I'd hook it up with a bunch of CO detectors, also. A few considerations, though: does your furnace/fireplace/stove/oben include an electric lighter or a pilot light. -- this would make resuming the supply a bit more dangerous


Maybe a manual open would be best. Just an electric close. In a power outage you could still use your stove etc (but not as a heater)

I have my tankless hot water heater on a UPS and it can probably run for weeks since it only draws 60 Watts to ignite (5 seconds) and 15 watts for the exhaust fan when running. Otherwise its about 1 watt standby.
 

Spanky

Senior Member
Would you prefer a wireless system or a hardwired system for the gas cutoff?

Thanks for any feedback. You are influencing the future.
 

opie

Active Member
ELK Products, Inc. has a water cutoff valve, ELK-WSV, for controlling the water supply in a home or business in case of a water leak or draining pipes in the winter.

Is there a need for a Natural Gas Cutoff Valve for automation control?

The Gas Cutoff Valve could turn off the gas in the case of a fire or detected gas leak.

It could incorporate a seismic detector to cut off the gas after an earth quake. This feature is required in some states.

It could have a lightning detector to detect a direct lightning strike into the gas line. Lightning can burn a hole in the flexible gas lines that are widely used in homes now. Such a hole can turn into a blow torch, burning down the house.

The system could be wireless or hardwired.

If you have any feelings on a gas cutoff valve, now is the time to speak up! :)

Recently, I had a client request this very item. I too would prefer wired.
 
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