Home Automation Online

Well, I didn't even start to read about their product, I just visited their main page. What is with a picture of a guy using a 10 year old Motorola (original) flip phone. Ummm...aren't they trying to get into a technology savvy market. :unsure:
 
sace agreed! couple that with the TERRIBLE verbage and I am left with an impression of some high school students trying to make a buck, lol. They need to hire a professional writer and web designer. Ouch, cant we be harsh! well its a tough world. :unsure:
 
Go to the bot demo page and type "turn the porch light on". It responds "Sorry my body cannot yet rotate." :unsure:
 
When the first page started talking about Soap and AJAX, my mind went elsewhere...... I'm sure it must mean something to someone but I started thinking of cleaning supplies :unsure:
 
The idea of an all knowing central server that is accessable from anywhere is interesting. Of course it has a recurring revenue model that will make the home automation integrators interested. Recurring revenue is the only way home automation is going to gain a major foothold in the market.
 
Man, everytime I do a search, it seems like there is some new Home Automation system promissing to change the world.

http://www.homeautomationonline.com/Default.aspx

I have requested the Web-API key for a full demo. Everytime I see these things, it makes me think this field is just starting and it is going to get crazy. It definitly makes me think FREE is the only way to compete, at least for an individual like me.

Anyways, if anyone knows about this software, I would like to hear more. AI is what it is all about for me, but I keep feeling more and more behind the curve.

Vaughn

Vaughn: Thanks for finding and posting this.

My long-term objective in 'Home Automation' involves the coupling of 'ubiquitous data collection', a comprehensive data base and Artificial Intelligence to produce a NeuralHome. These folks (whoever they are) would seem to be headed in that direction. We can hope that they figger out the pesky details (like dealing with 'bad' data) before their AI system [ specify some outrageously inappropriate automated action here].


First though, they need to run their web site through a spell checker. I wouldn't wanting someone who can't spell "control" to program the computer that controls my home [Snark Snark! ;-)

Marc

www.NeuralHome.com
www.NeuralHome.org
www.NeuralHome.net
www.NeuralHome.biz
www.NeuralHome.info
 
I saw an experimental automated home on TV that was 100% neural. You had to train it, so like when you turned on the TV it would predict you wanted the lights dimmed from previous patterns, if you then turned the lights back up, some times it would fight with you until the weighting system adjusted to its mistake. It was a nice system, but SOOOOOOOOO buggy.

Weighting systems can take a long time to get things right. It is a great concept though. Since I database Everything, I may at least start some trending. My approach would be for it not to actually do anything, but just continue to make guesses and when it is right, give itself a cookie so to speak and someday if it has enough cookies maybe I would let it try to create some rules on its own. I really think there are too many variables to do much though.

I think until we have accurate People tracking so the system knows exactly who is exactly where, you just can't build much logic automatically.

So Hult, I checked out your website and remember it from a ways back when I was first ramping up my HA research. So where are you at on it these days? What software are you using? Do you have any occupancy logic?

Vaughn
 
I saw an experimental automated home on TV that was 100% neural. [...] It was a nice system, but SOOOOOOOOO buggy.

[ ..] Since I database Everything, I may at least start some trending. My approach would be [ ..] to make guesses and when it is right, give itself a cookie so to speak and someday if it has enough cookies maybe I would let it try to create some rules on its own. I really think there are too many variables to do much though.

I think until we have accurate People tracking so the system knows exactly who is exactly where, you just can't build much logic automatically.

So Hult, I checked out your website and remember it from a ways back when I was first ramping up my HA research. So where are you at on it these days? What software are you using? Do you have any occupancy logic?

Vaughn

The basic system architecture is unchanged and consists of three 'realms':

I -- 100% Commercial , 3rd-party-serviceable, infrastructure subsystems (Napco Security, Aprilaire/Enerzone/Statnet HVAC, ethernet network, phone system, cable video system, manual lighting). The practical criteria is that if it breaks, one could call any of many different repair companies to fix it. This is much different than being tied to a particular HA/HT installer IMO.

II -- Custom subsystems using commercial software and firmware but custom rule-making (was CyberHouse, now --> HomeSeer +/- CQS; was X-10, now --> INSTEON; was Elk MM443, now ---> Elk M1G; IR Slinke; X-10 RF; etc). Turning these subsytems off should have no serious effect on home functioning, and they should " do no harm" whether enabled or disabled.

III -- Sandbox: Everything else including Work In Progress, both serious and HomeToys . These are in a sandbox for a reason ;-)

(Replacing X-10 with INSTEON has had the practical effect of moving that part of the lighting subsystem from Category II to Category I because INSTEON wall switches/dimmers are dead-ringers for high-end manual equivalents. They could be abandoned as HA component and still function jist fine as manual without bringing attention to themselves. That can't be said for the X10 WS467's they (mostly) replaced ;-)

I was frustrated by hardware limitations in the "people tracking" function. Although CyberHouse has/had some code that was ahead of its time ( eg Motion Vectors), the hard-wired Napco security system turned out to be too slow in reporting through either the RS-232 port or programmed relays to be useful.

One 'fix" would be to use the Elk M1G for a category II occupancy subsystem completely independent of the NAPCO and I've purchased one for that and other applications.

A splendid platform for the Realm III aka Sandbox is National Instruments' www.ni.com both LabView and Visual Studio . I plan to spring for Visual Studio 8.x because I have some non-HA (earth science) applications for it too. NI has robust hardware and software DAQ, real-time and DB presentation, deterministic and stochastic analysis tools with robotics and AI (which NI thinks stands for Automatic Inspection ;-) functions/extensibility that would take lifetimes to duplicate even poorly.

The homebrew ActiveKnob motorized potentiometer lighting system is progressing nicely. It has been fun , and now satisfying, partly owing to the advent/availability of inexpensive and technically manageable tools for microcontroller programming and PCB construction. The motor controller smarts migrated from PC-based to a very small on-motor PCB using AVR ATTiny MCU's.
I'm jist about ready to let loose/post with several more PCBs including THOL ( Temperature Humidity Occupancy and Lighting) sensor boards with redundant, conditioned 1-wire and 0-10vdc outputs, interface boards , potentiometer-mounted controller , battery-backed system power supplies and maybe, some initial AVR BASCOM code.

The PCBs can (mostly) be made and modified with the free version of Eagle PCB software www.cadsoft.de and the AVRs programmed ( mostly) with the free version of BASCOM www.mcselec.com

... Marc

www.NeuralHome.com .org .net .info .biz
 
Back
Top