How do IP cameras work as to IP address?

MRL

Active Member
OK. The wind has shifted. I am back looking at IP cameras. Besides the Panasonic BB-HCM331A, I am looking at the following Sony from CCTVSpeciality Sony IP camera The total specs are missing so I may call them on Monday. It has a 3.6mm lens and 2-way audio.
Do IP cameras come with a fixed IP address or can any IP address be stored or do they issue a DHCP request? I use a DHCP Router on my local Gigabit LAN. Just how do you set up an IP camera for viewing? If I have my own web server, can I access the camera on my local LAN? How do I access the camera away from home? I guess initially I could start with 2 pan and tilt IP cameras.
I really need to know just how these IP cameras are set up and accessed. Thanks. We are talking big bucks here (about $1,200 to start with 2 cameras) and I need to understand just what I am getting myself into with IP cameras.
 

mustangcoupe

Senior Member
They have a static address I dont beleive you can set them to dhcp. They come from the factory with a ip address programed and I beleive you can change this.
 

MRL

Active Member
They come from the factory with a ip address programed and I beleive you can change this.
So you could set a specific static address - like 192.168.1.100?
 

mustangcoupe

Senior Member
looks like I may have misspoken...

5. If I have more than one camera installed on my home network, how will I distinguish which camera I connect to given the fact that they are all on the same IP address?
While you are configuring each camera, you will have to assign each camera a unique port number. The port number will become part of the camera's IP address. http://192.168.0.253:81 (where :81 specifies the camera you designated to port #81) Note, when specifying a port number, YOU MUST have "http://" precede the IP Address.

Panasonic Network Cameras FAQ's
 

upstatemike

Senior Member
Make sure you are looking at an outdoor camera. (I couldn't get your link to work so I can't see the Sony). Most Pan/Tilt IP cameras are indoor only which is why I was looking at the Panasonic line.
 

wfernley

Member
Each manufacturer is diffferent when it comes to assigning IP addresses. Find out if the camera supports DHCP first.

Most do support DHCP but the rare one doesn't and usually has a default IP of 192.168.0.99 or something like that.
 

MRL

Active Member
Just ordered the Panasonic BB-HCM331A so I will find out in a few days just how all this works.
 

Madma_from_maui

New Member
MRL said:
Just ordered the Panasonic BB-HCM331A so I will find out in a few days just how all this works.
Once you have fled the camera into your local area network, there is usually a" camera finder" software application to find the camera on the network, or simple text indicating the default IP and password and username for the camera. One should have logged onto the camera, you can set the local IP address and port numbers. The public port used in conjunction with the WAN IP address is usually port 80, which is a default port. Of course if you're using more than one camera, or have other devices that use port 80, you will have to assign different IP addresses for each device to be accessed from outside the network. Not only that, most IP cameras with audio and PTZ have multiple port numbers, a port for audio, video, and the operation of the PTZ. All these ports must be different also. Changing the ports on the IP cameras themselves is the easy part, the hard part is configuring your router for these ports. You will need to use the advanced feature in your router, usually for gamers, and create a profile for each device or camera with the appropriate port range and local IP address so these devices can be found using the WAN.

I looked at the stats for this Panasonic camera, it seems to be rather expensive considering it is not a megapixel camera. The only justification for this kind of camera would be outdoor use, because it is weather resistant and does not require a separate dome which usually cost around $300 themselves.
 

MRL

Active Member
I looked at the stats for this Panasonic camera, it seems to be rather expensive considering it is not a megapixel camera.
If you have a less expensive alternative with similar specs from a reputable US distributor I would certainly like to know about it. I did considerable research and did not find an outdoor low-light CCD IP network pan/tilt/zoom camera with a better price than the Panasonic from newegg.com at $564.98 delivered. I looked at dome cameras and others that required a separate weatherproof housing - all much more expensive.
 

Madma_from_maui

New Member
MRL said:
I looked at the stats for this Panasonic camera, it seems to be rather expensive considering it is not a megapixel camera.
If you have a less expensive alternative with similar specs from a reputable US distributor I would certainly like to know about it. I did considerable research and did not find an outdoor low-light CCD IP network pan/tilt/zoom camera with a better price than the Panasonic from newegg.com at $564.98 delivered. I looked at dome cameras and others that required a separate weatherproof housing - all much more expensive.
I have had a lot of success with the Toshiba IK-WB11A

It has extremely light capabilities, with a 1/2" CCD, and 1.45 megapixel. It has 180° pan tilt, plus a five Digital Zoom. It even has built in WiFi, but I usually run ethernet when I can. And this camera can be had for the same price of the Panasonic, which is a non-megapixel camera.

Maui custom surveillance
 

MRL

Active Member
I have had a lot of success with the Toshiba IK-WB11A

Some Toshiba specs
14 °F to 104 °F (-10 °C to 40 °C)
Optional Accessories Netcam Outdoor Housing

The Toshiba seems to be an indoor camera and without the optional outdoor housing would not work for me. I am in an area where the temperature does often go below 14F in the winter. The optional housing will probably make the Toshiba considerably more expensive than the Panasonic. The going price for the camera without the housing seems to be $599.
It is nice to know about the Toshiba as an indoor camera possibility.
 

upstatemike

Senior Member
Madma_from_maui said:
Of course if you're using more than one camera, or have other devices that use port 80, you will have to assign different IP addresses for each device to be accessed from outside the network. Not only that, most IP cameras with audio and PTZ have multiple port numbers, a port for audio, video, and the operation of the PTZ. All these ports must be different also. Changing the ports on the IP cameras themselves is the easy part, the hard part is configuring your router for these ports. You will need to use the advanced feature in your router, usually for gamers, and create a profile for each device or camera with the appropriate port range and local IP address so these devices can be found using the WAN.
Madma_from_maui -

I'm going to get you to help me when I'm ready to configure my router to view cameras. I understand that each camera will be on a different port for the outside address and each camera will have a different inside address but can the inside address stay at port 80? Will a router forward my outside address of say xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx:8081 to say inside address 192.168.0.55:80 ? or would it have to be 192.168.0.55:8081 ?
 

Madma_from_maui

New Member
MRL said:
I have had a lot of success with the Toshiba IK-WB11A

Some Toshiba specs
14 °F to 104 °F (-10 °C to 40 °C)
Optional Accessories Netcam Outdoor Housing

The Toshiba seems to be an indoor camera and without the optional outdoor housing would not work for me. I am in an area where the temperature does often go below 14F in the winter. The optional housing will probably make the Toshiba considerably more expensive than the Panasonic. The going price for the camera without the housing seems to be $599.
It is nice to know about the Toshiba as an indoor camera possibility.
Actually, the Toshiba IK_WB11A is rated weather resistant, the documentation says the camera is rated for -4°F. Just about any camera, analog or IP, will at minus zero stop working unless they are equipped with a heated housing of some kind. To be honest, I'm sure a lot of my past projects would not survive your environment, I live on the island of Maui and low temperatures are not an issue for me. I have to consider the heat and salt water.
 
Top