how do you power it all??

forgets

Member
so here's my problem, i'm moving all my home automation / security / a/v stuff to a new location in the house, since it's all been spread out the first time i installed it.. and i've got the cans in, and now i've got to run power.. soooooooooo here's the problem hopefully some of my fellow cocooners can help me figure out.. i'm trying to figure out a way to have the whole thing powered while looking nice and clean.. normally i'm a completely stealth type of guy.. all the wiring and everything hidden in cans, so i've used the power knockouts in the cans to connect the wall warts from the m1, m1xep, sprinkler timer, etc.. however consolidating everything into 1 location gives me a new problem, i'm working with about 4 usable outlets (two leviton 28" cans is what most everything is going to fit in..) however all in all, right now i've got 9 wall warts, which is 1 too many.. and the number will probably go up in the future, so i'm looking into a more futureproof solution ... so that brings me to power strips.. they should be able to handle all the wall warts which need lots of spacing, and i get that extra 3" all the way down to the bottom of the can for extra stuff.. however my problem with power strips is that it's not at all hide-able.. while all my stuff is going to be in a cabinet of sorts.. (it's actually a top part of the pantry that was sectioned off) i've always much preffered to have nothing visible.. so, anyone know of any way i can hide outlets and have wall warts plugged into them, and still have them accessible (since i'm not trying to be out of electrical code here) ... i've been looking and looking but i don't think anything exists.. and in the off case it doesn't.. i guess i'll have to go with a hardwired power strip that is also surge capable.. can anyone recommend one.. ? i keep running into the Tripp Lite PS3612-20HW which has 12 outlets which is great, and it's hardwired, another plus, since i'm not too much a fan of plugs.. but is it surge..? i didn't see whether or not it was..

and sorry about the huge paragraph, .. which i'm going to break from now.. anyway, if anyone's used a power strip in their install, i'd be happy to be able to see photo's .. the only one i came across was steve's sisters' install, which had them mounted in the cans..which isn't an option for me..

i really appreciate any help anyone can give.. i'll try and post photo's of what all this is about later.. thanks.
 

electron

Administrator
Staff member

Digger

Senior Member
You might want to use one of those "Octopus" type extensions instead of a power strip or multiple outlets in a can. The problem would be all of those "wall warts" flopping around. I would use the velcro to attach them to the can but make them easily replacable etc.

Then again for the 12 Vdc I would go with Electron's idea and provide battery backup as well.
 

pkoslow

Active Member
I agree with Electron... instead of figuring out how to plug in and hide all those wall warts, try consolidating to one or two larger power supplies that can each provide power to multiple pieces of gear.

I'm using something similar to the Elk PD9, just a little more industrial. One provides 12v and another provides 24v. These two power supplies provide battery backup, individual fused connections and power everything from all the Elk gear, Ocelot, RFID, Russound A-Bus and door locks/strikes.

Here's a couple pictures... products are from Altronix:

Cheers,
Paul

12vDC-Power.jpg


24vDC-Power.jpg
 

Paul

Active Member
Digger said:
You might want to use one of those "Octopus" type extensions instead of a power strip or multiple outlets in a can. The problem would be all of those "wall warts" flopping around. I would use the velcro to attach them to the can but make them easily replacable etc.

Then again for the 12 Vdc I would go with Electron's idea and provide battery backup as well.
Powersquid to the rescue!
 

SpaceCowboy

Active Member
electron said:
Currently, my PD9 provides power to
  • W800RF32 receiver
  • Elk M1XEP
  • Ocelot
  • Secu16
  • IR blaster
Electron,

But isn't he W800RF32 9volt requirement? Did you use some form of resistor to tone down the voltage?

Thanks

P.S. This is perfect timing, I just ordered my new cans and was thinking about the same thing. Lesson to everyone, just start with a huge can (or two) instead if redoing everything twice.
 

Digger

Senior Member
You might want to use one of those "Octopus" type extensions instead of a power strip or multiple outlets in a can. The problem would be all of those "wall warts" flopping around. I would use the velcro to attach them to the can but make them easily replacable etc.

Then again for the 12 Vdc I would go with Electron's idea and provide battery backup as well.


Powersquid to the rescue!

Octopus......... Squid....... whats the difference???? :unsure:

A few months back Rad Shack had them for $10 so I bought one just for this type of situation.
 

JayH

Member
I also opted for the Altronix 12V power unit/battery backup and added a PD8 fused power distribution panel and a low voltage disconnect. Working just fine for several years.

Watch the Ocelot/SECU16 (Applied Digital devices in general) and other devices sharing the same PSU because the negative battery contact is NOT the "signal ground". Each unit has a full wave rectifier in it so there is a diode drop between "signal ground" and "battery negative" which creates interesting issues if you don't watch them.

Jay
 
Has anyone else with a few old PC power supplies laying around thought, "hey, I wonder If I can put one of those in a can and use it to distribute my 12V power?".

If you think about it, a PC PSU is a pretty nice piece of hardware. It's got convenient mounting screw holes and a nice cooling fan. The 12V rails can handle alot of current. (The specs I see list a 500W PSU at over 30A max on the 12V bus)

Anyhow, has anyone ever done this? ever burned down there house?

-Chuck
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
All good advice here! B)

My thought is if you are going to go through all the trouble in mounting and integration to your precious automation and security system, use something like an ELK power distribution unit and power supply with battery backup.

The reason is this has a lot more advantages such as short circuit protection (a must) plus on board battery backup.

I put a DIRECT SHORT (don't ask, long story) on my Elk 12 volt supply and it just shut down till the short was removed.

I would also recommend a distribution system so that its "full" amperage isn't being distributed via wiring to say a lonely motion sensor. Think about all that low voltage wiring running all over your house. The distribution unit gives you a low fused setting for specific zones.

I'm partial to the Elk products because (and I've proven this to myself :D ) they are bulletproof. Very well made and backed by excellent engineering design. This goes for a lot of their other products I use such as their echo speakers, stand alone 800 amplifier, timer/delay board, and sensitive relays. (BTW for new members, I am NOT affiliated with Elk and actually do criticise their products such as the M1 Gold at times ;) ).

Regards,

BSR
 

electron

Administrator
Staff member
PC power supplies are definitely nice, I use them to power my 12V halloween projects, but they are big, heat generating hard to mount device :D The protection the Elk PD9 provides is a nice bonus as well.
 

noshali

Active Member
Folks,

Any suggestion on products that do the same thing as the PD9 but provide higher amps and if possible to send different volts to differnt outputs.

regards
 
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