Installing ceiling speakers with blown insulation

How does one go about installing ceiling speakers with blown-in insulation?

I'm thinking you need to some how may a space in the insulation for the speakers. I'm curious what others have done?
 

IVB

Senior Member
I cleared out the blown-in, cut the hole, mounted the speaker. I then got a very small amount of roll-in insulation to put over the speaker (HD sells 5' lengths).

Works pretty well, the insulation clearly makes a difference in the bass inside the room.
 

WayneW

Senior Member
How does one go about installing ceiling speakers with blown-in insulation?
Very carefully.

I had no trouble doing it, but it is a little messy. I cut a smaller hole to get my hand through to try and push back as much insulation as possible, then I cut the big hole. Some insulation will fall through, just use a sheet or drop cloth. Then I cut some unfaced R30 batt insulation (2 strips, 24" long x 15" wide, crosswise between the 24" trusses) to make a 24" wide by 30" long section that I could push up through the hole (or add afterwards from the attic) and create a pocket for the speaker. You don't want to get blown insulation bits into the speaker. There also seemed to be much debate about the pros & cons of building "cabinets" for the speakers and it seemed like surrounding them with batt insulation seemed like what the manufacturer typically expected.
 

IVB

Senior Member
How does one go about installing ceiling speakers with blown-in insulation?
Very carefully.

I had no trouble doing it, but it is a little messy. I cut a smaller hole to get my hand through to try and push back as much insulation as possible, then I cut the big hole. Some insulation will fall through, just use a sheet or drop cloth. Then I cut some unfaced R30 batt insulation (2 strips, 24" long x 15" wide, crosswise between the 24" trusses) to make a 24" wide by 30" long section that I could push up through the hole (or add afterwards from the attic) and create a pocket for the speaker. You don't want to get blown insulation bits into the speaker. There also seemed to be much debate about the pros & cons of building "cabinets" for the speakers and it seemed like surrounding them with batt insulation seemed like what the manufacturer typically expected.

Dang, you put in an in-ceiling speaker without access to the ceiling from the other side?
 

shenandoah75

Active Member
I'm about to install as well for whole house audio....

Most of mine are going in ceilings with a second story above, so attic access isn't an option so i have to do like wayne did. There is currently already batt (1 layer) laied up in those joists.... Like Wayne, i have been reading about turning the space into a true close box, but again, the second story makes that near impossible without ripping out ceiling/floor.

Question from me: the batt is thin and definately doesnt seal the cavity ~12" high... should i put 1 or two more layers up there? Wayne, are you as happy as IVB with bass response for music usage? I think you can but backing recesses (similar to what they offer for car audio too.


-brad
 

WayneW

Senior Member
Dang, you put in an in-ceiling speaker without access to the ceiling from the other side?
Sort of. I have attic access to almost everything, but around the edges where the roof comes down and the trusses are congested it gets real awkward. I worked in the attic to do the wiring, but didn't see much meed for attic access for hole cutting. Cleaning up the floor was easier then going up to pre-clean the ceiling, since I had some drywall dust anyway.

Brad, you should be able to stack the batts to fill up the cavity. I would use unfaced. I have some speakers that are easy to get to from the attic that I decided to add the batt insulation from above, so the insulation is still on my to-do list. Therefore I have a couple speakers with no insulation around them and I haven't noticed that much difference in bass response.
 

Steve

Senior Member
I just saw these and they looked like a good inexpensive solution (even in addition to fiberglass batt). Here is a better look at them. Anyone see an issue with them?
 

wired-up

Member
I used something similar to what Steve shows above, but cheaper and more readily available. Plastic shower caps. 6 for 89 cents at a local bargain store. plastic, round with elastic at base. They fit well over my 6 and 8 inch speakers and did ok with some stretching of the elastic over the 10 inch. I can tell some difference in my speakers with more bass in the ones that had the batts of insulation. Enough difference that I went back and added insulation to the others.
David
 

WayneW

Senior Member
I wonder how cheap shower caps will hold up to Florida attic temperatures? Of course, I have no assurances that the "expensive" custom thingys will be perfect either.
 

wired-up

Member
I wonder how cheap shower caps will hold up to Florida attic temperatures? Of course, I have no assurances that the "expensive" custom thingys will be perfect either.

Since they are on the living side of the insulation, I hope the temp is not too severe for the speaker's sake. I can easily get to several in my walk-in attic, so I'll let you know in a few months how they are surviving.
david
 
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