Splitting the incoming cable signal. Help!

Sacedog

Active Member
Well, I am downright frustrated at this point. I have tried 10 ways from Sunday to add a 4th TV at my in-laws house, and cannot get it working. Here is what they currently have setup:
  • Incoming cable goes to a 2-way splitter. One side goes to the cable modem, the other side goes to video distribution.
  • Video distribution goes to an powered applifier, which goes to a 3-way splitter
  • The 3-way splitter goes to 2 HD DVR boxes, and 1 Digital Cable Box
I am simply trying to add one more TV, that is directly connected without another box. I have tried adding a 2-way splitter off of each of the three feeds from the amplifier. Each time I do so, the video on the box on that feed that I split does not work (the picture is choppy, has digital artifacts, or is just simply not there).

I also tried removing the amplifier and 3-way splitter, and installing an OnQ 2x16 amplified module, which I connected the 3 boxes and 1 TV to. Still not enough juice.

The problem is that their house is way up on a hill, and their cable pull is about 100 yards from the cable company's repeater, and the signal is very weak by the time it reaches the house.

Any ideas on how I could remedy the problem without spending a ton of money? Can I place anther amplifier after the first one? I would really rather not use rabbit ears. ;)

The cable company said that what really needs to happen is for them to trench up the hill, and install a repeater closer to the house. Due to the high cost of that for the 2 customers that are on the hill, it was unlikely that would happen, however.
 

edge

Active Member
Having worked for Time Warner several years ago, this is what happens when 'consultants' design the cable plant, rather than true engineers.
The home is too far from the pedistal, yet there is just enough signal for the cable company to get you as a customer.

try this: check all, and I do mean all of the cable connections, both outside and inside. You'd be amazed at how many installs I've seen where the crimps weren't tight.

We had a customer with a similar situation to yours---his complaint got escalated to the Mayors office. One of the Chief Engineers had to go out, and admitted that another line amplifier was needed.

Good luck

Another thought---is the cable service 'overhead' or 'underground'?
 

SnyperBob

Active Member
Initially, It sounds like by the time the video gets to your TV's (or cable boxes) it has gone through two splitters. (The initial 2 way, and they the video distribution 3 way).

You said you are trying to add another two way to the three way, effectively making three splits by the time it gets to your cable box/TV.

Why don't you just try eliminating the extra split, and get a single 4 way. You already mentioned that your signal is weak, I'm pretty sure each time you add another splitter it degrades the signal even more (even if you have an amplifier).
 

nightwalker

Active Member
Initially, It sounds like by the time the video gets to your TV's (or cable boxes) it has gone through two splitters. (The initial 2 way, and they the video distribution 3 way).

You said you are trying to add another two way to the three way, effectively making three splits by the time it gets to your cable box/TV.

Why don't you just try eliminating the extra split, and get a single 4 way. You already mentioned that your signal is weak, I'm pretty sure each time you add another splitter it degrades the signal even more (even if you have an amplifier).

You don't have much choice but to use the 2way splitter but the side going to the video shouldn't have anymore than one splitter or you will lose signal strength. Using a 6 or 8 port amplified splitter would be far better than using multiple splitters.

Also i swear i read in the FCC regulations that cable companies are required to provide at least 10db of signal strength to each customers home. No mention was made about there being exceptions for distance, if they took you on as a customer they need to provide you with a decent signal.
 

Sacedog

Active Member
When the cable tech was out, he measured around 4.5 - 5 db. He was amazed that it was that low, and said that he would put through a request for a new ped. That was weeks ago, and I never heard back.

I bought a CVT-15PIA amp, and a CV 2-way and 4-way splitter. I am going to go out this weekend and replace all of their crap, to see if it helps. If not, it may be time to call the Sat. company. :) Luckily, we are only here until our house build is complete. I'll post if it helps or not.
 

mustangcoupe

Senior Member
Just remember th as you split the signal 3 dB down is 1/2 the power. Your splitters will divide the power evenly between ports so keep this in mind when aranging the splitters. Maybe even move the amplifier before the 1st splitter.
 

Sacedog

Active Member
Just remember th as you split the signal 3 dB down is 1/2 the power. Your splitters will divide the power evenly between ports so keep this in mind when aranging the splitters. Maybe even move the amplifier before the 1st splitter.

Would this be the correct setup if the first split is for the cable modem?
 

mustangcoupe

Senior Member
Just remember th as you split the signal 3 dB down is 1/2 the power. Your splitters will divide the power evenly between ports so keep this in mind when aranging the splitters. Maybe even move the amplifier before the 1st splitter.

Would this be the correct setup if the first split is for the cable modem?

It would all depend on the frequency used by the cable modem and the frequencies of the amplifier.... Actually that may also be another problem, I know around here Comcast told me they needed "High quality" high frequency splitters as the old ones cut off at lower frequencies and block some of their signals.
 

mustangcoupe

Senior Member
I recently used a powered amplifier from radio shack, worked great in that situation I put it between the splitters, in your case You have enough signal to run the cable modem and the other TV's but dont have enough power for the additional TV. I guess Id try the amplifier in between the splitters, remember to watch the input vs output of the amplifier, as it is bidirectional but not in the same bands.... Another possibility is a bad cable or port on the splitter try to move the good tv to the bad port and so forth.
 
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