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Web Server for

JohnBullard

Active Member
Has anyone used a product similar to this Camera Web Server

Their price is $179.00

I know most of you IT Pros integrate your cameras onto webpages, but I'm just an "Insurance Man", looking for an easy, not to expensive method.

BTW, this site seems to have some pretty good security products, prices from $39 to over $5000

Any links to other similar products would be appreciated
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
Hi John:

I have no experience with the web server you mentioned, but I'm a little jittery with cheap web servers after my experience with this IP Video 9100a unit (which sells for about that same price).

I evaluated this unit and was amazed that it actually went to market with all of its software flaws. Horrid would be the word that bets sums this unit up. I even had electron take a look at it (via the internet) and he agreed.

I have to do a mini review of it yet (work piling up).

Now, I am NOT saying that the unit you mentioned would have the same performance, BUT, I AM saying proceed with caution.

Can you purchase it with some sort of "return if not satisfied" policy? Also I could not find any ratings for that store on Reseller Ratings site (but this is not necessarily a bad indication of that vendor either).

Again, not saying that unit has ANYTHING wrong with it, just trying to watch out for my friend.

Hopefully someone can reply with direct experience with that unit and vendor's site.

Regards,

BSR
 

JohnBullard

Active Member
Thanks for your comments BSR.

I have not done business with this company before. In the "About Us" section, they say they have a 30 day return policy.

I have their printed catalog, and noticed this item today, and was just courious about it or similar products, "That Work" ;)
 

Stinger

Active Member
I know you said you weren't really an "IT pro", so I'll spare elaborating on the best products I've found and use - Active Webcam / DVR card / Modulator (for TVs).

Soo.. If you're only looking at getting two cameras, and your main requirement is to be able to access them via the web, why not just spring for an IP camera? When you total the cost for this device, a camera, and add the benefit of Pan / Tilt(on the better cams), I believe it is a wash or just slightly higher in price.

Links to low-cost IP Cameras - I've never used these, so I'm not recommending, just options for you to look at.

I prefer the Dlink 5300s, but I think this might be more than you're looking to spend.

Any place that refers to 15 Fps as "stunning" as the store you linked has me a bit concerned. To better help you, let us know exactly what you're trying to accomplish and with how many cameras?

I just stumbled upon another option for you, but I certainly cannot vouch for the quality:

Homeplug Ip Camera Server Kit

It actually has me a bit intriqued, but I don't need any more cams!
 

Stinger

Active Member
Hmmm.. I just noticed the above cameras operate at up to 14Mbps over the POWER LINEs. I wonder if they'd interfere with X10 at all?

Anyone have any experience? I may get them just to review 'em.

Here's a cheaper site that sells the kit for $156 vs $199:

Powerline cams

Product Info HERE.
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
A couple of thoughts.

If you need night or low light cameras, it may not be cheaper to get two IP cameras with this capability. Plus some of those low cost cameras are CMOS which are generally low quality.

An example of this would be to look at THIS camera which incorporates a Sony CCD chip as well as low light capability for $180.

Two of these cameras plus this unit would be $180 x 3 = $540.

An equivalent IP camera such as the Axis 221 will run double that amount and you would have only one camera.

Also, I'd make sure those cameras operating over the power line did not interfere with my X-10 equipment.
 

Stinger

Active Member
I haven't done this either, but for non-low light cams, can't an IR light just be added? I'd like to try this with some of my cams.

39 Light IR Illuminator on Ebay for about $25

High Power 140 IR LED for about $72 on Ebay

Any opinions on how well these would work?

As far as the powerline cams, I'm still doing research, but everything I've found says it's X10 Friendly:

The specification also will be interoperable with other power-line systems such as x10 and Cebus.
Network World Review of the technology

Hometoys info on Homeplug

Background on Homeplug

I think I've convinced myself. <sigh>.. Another project I need to add to my list when I'm home again.
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
Stinger said:
I haven't done this either, but for non-low light cams, can't an IR light just be added? I'd like to try this with some of my cams.
Hmmm, I think a camera's image sensor needs to be IR sensitive in order to see that wavelength. I don't believe all cameras have this capability.

Our friend Skibum could probably elaborate on this more when he sees this post! (Ok, your on Ski... ;) )
 

Stinger

Active Member
Ah, that makes sense. I suppose it would at least improve on the low lux cameras that just need a little extra IR light.

How would I tell for instance if this CAMERA was IR sensitive?

Thanks.
 

rocco

Active Member
14mbs HomePlug is dead. 200mbs HomePlug is coming.

I had some Siemens HomePlug adapters for Ethernet, and they do work with X10. But HomePlug never took off, because 54G WiFi was cheaper, faster, easier. I ended up switching over to WiFi when Siemens dropped the line. You can't even find HomePlug in the stores anymore. With only 14mbs available bandwidth, however, I think it's a poor choice for a camera. Unless you only want to get a occasional still.

The new HomePlug specification is targeting network cameras and other multimedia, and has a somewhat better chance to succeed. But with UWB on the horizon as well, you never know.

BraveSirRobbin said:
Hmmm, I think a camera's image sensor needs to be IR sensitive in order to see that wavelength.
Yes, you're right. But fortunately, almost all cameras are IR sensitive. The image sensors, both CCD and CMOS, are inherently IR sensitive. I heard that some cameras, however, had IR filters added, and they will not work with IR. But I have yet to come across a camera that didn't work with IR. (tip: You can use a camera to test IR remotes).
 

JohnBullard

Active Member
Thanks for you comments and suggestions, Stinger and BSR.

Let me explain what I have now.

I have 4 outdoor cameras, (for the past 5 years), upgraded quality from time to time. 3 are color cams, Sony CCD chips with infared illuminators.

One is mounted under the eve looking at the front door, (a color cmos chip cam) the others are mounted away from the house, on Ninja mounts.

No 2 is on a 6 foot column (about 5 feet from the house), scans from the front steps out to street covering all of the entry sidewalks.

No 3 is mounted on an 8 ft column the opposite side of the driveway(about 18 feet from the house) scaning the driveway from the street to the garage doors.

The last is on a 15 ft tower, approx 30 feet from the house, scans the back of the house, part of the driveway, to the garage doors.

Each of the cams are connected to transmitters, 434Mhz, 915Mhz, 1.2Ghz, 2.4 Ghz

The respective receivers feed a 4 channel sequential switcher (approx 10 secs per camera), which feeds the output to a UHF TV transmitter on channel 14, which is in my attic.

This allows regular TV receivers to be used as monitors. Some are standard 13" CRT sets and some are 7" LCD receivers. Every room in the house therefore has a monitor.

Just looking for an easy way to also inject the output onto my network, and also the internet for when I'm traveling.

Therefore just looking for a "web server module" which would accept either a baseband video or NTSC signal as input.

I had previously thought about buying one of the IP cams and hacking to get to the webserver module, then I saw the item I referenced in my first post, and fiqured someting similar would do what I wanted, without using a DVR card and software.
 

Skibum

Senior Member
BraveSirRobbin said:
Stinger said:
I haven't done this either, but for non-low light cams, can't an IR light just be added? I'd like to try this with some of my cams.
Hmmm, I think a camera's image sensor needs to be IR sensitive in order to see that wavelength. I don't believe all cameras have this capability.

Our friend Skibum could probably elaborate on this more when he sees this post! (Ok, your on Ski... ;) )
Correctomundo.... IR illuminators on a cam without ir sensitivity will do nothing.
 

JohnBullard

Active Member
Thanks Ski,

On the same site, i found thissingle channel version.

This difference seems to be this one is jpeg while the 4 channel one is m-jpeg.

Time for jpeg vs m-jpeg research.

Thanks again
 

electron

Administrator
Staff member
m-jpeg is basically a video format, where the frames are streamed using jpeg compression. My Panasonic camera does this, and it works fine with all browsers. Usually a web interface will either provide you with an applet for the live video view, or the m-jpeg option. I prefer the m-jpeg since it can be used with other software, while applets lock you in to the interface the webserver of that device provides.
 
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