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wireless extender

Mike

Senior Member
Anyone had experience with this:

http://www.smarthome.com/6404HK.html

I was considering using it to run in my attic/garage to give me great strength throughout the house and outside it. I would not use the antenna's in the rooms like they show, but I like the coax distribution and should get equivalent benefits from putting it up in the garage and three points in the attic.
 

noshali

Active Member
Mike said:
Anyone had experience with this:

http://www.smarthome.com/6404HK.html

I was considering using it to run in my attic/garage to give me great strength throughout the house and outside it. I would not use the antenna's in the rooms like they show, but I like the coax distribution and should get equivalent benefits from putting it up in the garage and three points in the attic.
I don't knwo about this one. How about just get the N router.....according to the N protocol it has to be able to cover an entire house.(5,000 SQ ft)...therefore the new routers should be good enough to cover the entire house and should not need any need for range extenders.

regards,
 

mustangcoupe

Senior Member
The N router protocol has not been defined/adopted yet. So any early adopters may buy into a protocol that is not going to be the final one and have compatiblity issues once they all agree on what it should be...

wikipedia said:
802.11n
Release Date Op. Frequency Data Rate (Typ) Data Rate (Max) Range (Indoor)
expected mid-2007 2.4 GHz 200 Mbit/s 540 Mbit/s 50 m

In January 2004 IEEE announced that it had formed a new 802.11 Task Group (TGn) to develop a new amendment to the 802.11 standard for wireless local-area networks. The real data throughput is estimated to reach a theoretical 540 Mbit/s (which may require an even higher raw data rate at the physical layer), and should be up to 100 times faster than 802.11b, and well over 10 times faster than 802.11a or 802.11g. It is projected that 802.11n will also offer a better operating distance than current networks.

There were two competing proposals of the 802.11n standard: WWiSE (World-Wide Spectrum Efficiency), backed by companies including Broadcom, and TGn Sync backed by Intel and Philips.

Previous competitors TGn Sync, WWiSE, and a third group, MITMOT, said in late July 2005 that they would merge their respective proposals as a draft which would be sent to the IEEE in September; a final version will be submitted in November. The standardization process is expected to be completed by the second half of 2006.

802.11n builds upon previous 802.11 standards by adding MIMO (multiple-input multiple-output). MIMO uses multiple transmitter and receiver antennas to allow for increased data throughput through spatial multiplexing and increased range by exploiting the spatial diversity, perhaps through coding schemes like Alamouti coding.

The Enhanced Wireless Consortium (EWC)[1] was formed to help accelerate the IEEE 802.11n development process and promote a technology specification for interoperability of next-generation wireless local area networking (WLAN) products.

On January 19, 2006, the IEEE 802.11n Task Group approved the Joint Proposal's specification, based on EWC's specification as the confirmed 802.11n proposal.

At the March 2006 meeting, the IEEE 802.11 Working Group sent the 802.11n Draft to its first letter ballot, which means that the 500+ 802.11 voters get to review the document and suggest bugfixes, changes and improvements.

On May 2, 2006, the IEEE 802.11 Working Group voted not to forward Draft 1.0 of the proposed 802.11n standard for a sponsor ballot. Only 46.6% voted to accept the proposal. To proceed to the next step in the IEEE process, a majority vote of 75% is required. This letter ballot also generated approximately 12000 comments -- much more than anticipated.

According to the IEEE 802.11 Working Group Project Timelines,[2] the 802.11n standard is not due for final approval until July 2007.

with that in mind Linksys is jumping the gun in offering their N wireless hardware. Or are they$$?
 

Mike

Senior Member
I have a wireless router that will do N (I needed a new one and it gave me more options for not much more money). I was not looking to buy client adapters until things were further along.

Would this distribution approach work for all wireless types?

I have older laptops with G cards, a current laptop with G built in. I don't really feel like buying pre-n stuff that could be out of date soon (until we see how that goes at least). Like I said only reason the router can do it is it happened to make sense to spend the extra few dollars just in case, and I needed a new one right then for work.
 

mustangcoupe

Senior Member
Duplexer Insertion Loss: 5~65MHz: 9dB; 87~550MHz: 10dB; 550~860MHz: 11.5dB; 2400~2450MHz: 15dB
Rejection out of Bandwidth: Low Pass (TV IN, 1-2.5GHz): 38dB; High Pass (RF IN, 5-860MHz): 35dB

the duplexer is what they are using to combine the singals and they only spec out the above bands... I would guess it will work with any frequency in the 2400~2450MHz band so 5.8 ghz stuff wont work, and 900 MHz stuff also wont work.
 
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