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New Uplink LTE for Elk M1 - 5500ATT


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#1 davedavez

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 01:50 PM

My central station is starting their push to move customers to LTE in advance of the anticipated 4G sunset. (Yes, I know it's still a ways off) I'm using a 4500EZ with serial interface to the M1 and it was looking like the only replacement option would be dialer capture, but Uplink fixed it with a new LTE 5500ATT communicator. It's a drop-in replacement for any old Uplink using the 10-pin header to serial cable. There was quite a bit of back and forth between my monitoring company and their distributor trying to get the part number right, but it is now available and on the way to me shortly.

 

Given how challenging/confusing it can be to DIY monitoring, I thought you all might like to know.



#2 lanbrown

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 04:52 PM

The problem here is that terms get misused.  So while AT&T and Verizon say 4G, they don't really mean 4G.  They actually mean what they call 4G but in reality, it is 3G.  LTE is recognized as a 4G technology under US and International standards.  LTE is not what is being sunset, but the enhanced 3G service that Verizon and AT&T called 4G.

 

AT&T calls they enhanced LTE service 5G, but they also have a true 5G service as well.

 

The reason for the reply to your post is that someone could have a 4G modem in their alarm and yet they are actually set since it is already LTE.



#3 ano

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 04:06 PM

The problem here is that terms get misused.  So while AT&T and Verizon say 4G, they don't really mean 4G.  They actually mean what they call 4G but in reality, it is 3G.  LTE is recognized as a 4G technology under US and International standards.  LTE is not what is being sunset, but the enhanced 3G service that Verizon and AT&T called 4G.

 

AT&T calls they enhanced LTE service 5G, but they also have a true 5G service as well.

 

The reason for the reply to your post is that someone could have a 4G modem in their alarm and yet they are actually set since it is already LTE.

That is exactly right. The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) is the governing body for defining mobile technology, and unfortunately they have done a very poor job at enforcing the use of the "G" labels.  Wireless operators have taken advantage of that for marketing advantages, to fool a public that wouldn't know the difference from 3G to 5G if it bit them in the rear. 

 

3G which isn't used much will be with us until at least 2022. True 4G likely won't disappear until 2034 if not later. You have plenty of time.



#4 lanbrown

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 04:32 PM

In case anyone wants to read about it.  The naming convention means little to most but means something to the marketing folks.  After all, 4G must be faster than 3G right?

 

https://www.cnet.com...st-its-meaning/

 

Yes, this issue goes back to 2011.  Maybe this is why in WLAN (WiFi) land, they have decided to move away from the standard naming convention that equipment makers use and for the consumer use a more friendly name.  Not many could tell you what 802.11N is compared to 802.11AC let alone 802.11AC Wave 1 and 802.11AC Wave 2.






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