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Anyone Here Start Their Own Security/Burglar Alarm Company?

dementeddigital

Active Member
DELInstallations said:
I'd read this article: http://www.securitysales.com/article/alarm-company-s-carelessness-costs-customer-her-life
This article is fact. Cost the installation company in the realm of 9 digits if rumors are correct in the industry.
 
Wow!  Tragic, but a very interesting read.  It makes me miss my 100 pound German Shepherd.  He was a low-tech, but very effective, notification system.
 
Some of the mistakes in the article seemed like pretty basic stuff (like how the PIRs were wired and the glass break location).  I'm sure they had reasons for installing the way they did.  I'd like to know why they made some of those decisions.
 
Having worked as a commercial LV wiring contractor in the past, I'm not sure I'd want to go back to doing that.  My back and knees would probably complain a lot these days.  Programming the systems and troubleshooting might be fun, but pulling lots of wire is for younger folks.
 
@ demented: A lot of that article stems back to bad installation practices, bad training and bad understanding of how the components work, program and functionality. One of the controls in the pictures in the article is a 2 way voice unit (AAV). That unit is fine for the VOIP the customer was using and the panel connected to, yet the cell backup unit was installed and it would NEVER function due to the VOIP lines....yet a "dumb" test by unplugging the host system from the VOIP lines/31X would make the unit appear like it would function correctly, yet did the installers ever disconnect the cable from the Arris modem (in picture) to perform a true test to see if the line voltage went away?
 
I don't necessarily agree that the line cut should've been turned on or the additional programming for arming methods. That's a contractual discussion and also one that needs to happen with the customer. The only thing in the article was the panel COULD do certain things, but nowhere was the discussion that it was mandated that such features or options MUST have been programmed or turned on. Maybe as a high risk install, sure, but knowing the installing vendor, doubtful that it was brought up.
 
I don't know, however, if the test jumpers and other items were put in by the techs....if so, that's purely bad practice. Same goes for the fact the system already had service calls out on it and other items were not completed or brought online.
 

ccmichaelson

Active Member
I get the general sentiment and it's obvious you guys know your stuff and are passionate about it...  On the flip side, in the past few years I've seen a TON of new security companies/devices flood the market.  Mostly cheap wireless crap that the homeowner can purchase online and set up within a few minutes or the stupid ADT/Vivint wireless systems that a "tech" installs in less than an hour.
 
The reason I ran 25,000 linear feet of wire in the house I just built was to bring together the best of both worlds - home automation & security.  Everyone that has come over can not believe the amount of security and automation control (including my neighbor who installs Crestron for a living).  
 
Apparently a home owner can install his own security system because I certainly did and the main county building inspector was so impressed he asked me to do similar things in the home he's currently building, which really got me thinking about my original post/question.
 
Appreciate the feedback...  would love to hear more especially if anyone here actually started a new security/burglar company (or automation but also does security) and how you achieved licensing/etc.
 
I got my journeyman's license in '98 or '99 after 2 years as an apprentice (documented) and about 4 years in the industry (undocumented) prior. I then increased my classification and added my contractor's license around '06. Started my own business in about '07 and continued working for others and hopped around a bit until about the last 6 years (moved to a lot bigger systems).
 
Really, all things said, not to discourage, but generally the way in is to pay your dues and time and take the hard knocks under a contractor. The only other way would be to buy into an existing business and use someone else's license until you're qualified to obtain your own. That's generally how it happens.....but around here, in doing that, the other party must register you as an apprentice and sign off on your hours.
 
Your state is somewhat unique, where they require a company license to sell, so that negates some of the loopholes in this area of the country where people can sell 100% wireless and even install, provided they do not run any cabling (even for a plug in transformer). Grey would be if they took a 10' length of bulk cable and just made a whip to a tabletop unit.
 

CarolP

Member
All those aspiring to start new security systems or burglar alarm companies, keep yourself updated with the latest changes the police services are making to home security .The latest changes enforced for home security response service aims at reducing the rate of false alarm  and thus save precious time.  Check this article on the changes made to the security bylaws by the Alberta police http://www.sleepwellsecurity.ca/blog/home-security/recent-upcoming-changes-alberta-police-services-making-home-security/. Security systems which do not meet Enhanced Call verification requirements  will not be granted according to the Alarm Bylaw 10922.
 

Sparkman1

Active Member
CarolP said:
All those aspiring to start new security systems or burglar alarm companies, keep yourself updated with the latest changes the police services are making to home security .The latest changes enforced for home security response service aims at reducing the rate of false alarm  and thus save precious time.  Check this article on the changes made to the security bylaws by the Alberta police systems which do not meet Enhanced Call verification requirements  will not be granted according to the Alarm Bylaw 10922.
The article makes no sense as there is no such thing as the Alberta Police.  Bylaws are for municipalities and that bylaw appears to be for Edmonton, not all of Alberta...
 
Someone rightly mentioned that it's very much possible for a home owner to install security systems on his own. But, I also see the importance of checking the key security necessities of a particular zone or area.
 
 
Someone rightly mentioned that it's very much possible for a home owner to install security systems on his own. But, I also see the importance of checking the key security necessities of a particular zone or area.
 
There are a number of effective DIY systems now-a-days, but not can match your necessities. A few good instances of burglaries can help you identify your regional risks. If you can't make good use of a DIY system, then it's always inyour interest to seek professional assistance.
 

LarrylLix

Senior Member
The article also contradicts itself. It states they won't respond and then later states they will fine you for false calls.
 
Usually others cannot "fine" you, not being a court of law, but they can charge you for services.
 
Just another useless money grab by a government, that accomplishes nothing, or just spam from a company attempting to use fear factor to promote themselves..
 
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