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[How-To] Install A Home Security System

bfisher

Active Member
the glass breaks I use prefer line of sight, but will work with minor obstructions. You don't want a door or wall in the way.

There are glass break testers available, but I've found I can clap my hands loud and make it register a signal (not strong enough to set it off though unless I'm close to the sensor). I've used this clapping just to test it's wired properly - not to test placement. My sensors are good to 25 ft radius, but sensitivity can be "turned down" to 15ft if desired.

<note: I looked for a link to where I purchased my sensors and they don't seem to carry it anymore. Not sure if they still are made or not. These are very similar. >
 

Squintz

Senior Member
Sorry I am off topic but I wanted to share a tip with you when installing a wall cover for switches and receptacles. Notice in your second picture of your first post you have a group of light switches. If you simple adjust the screw so that the slots are all facing the same direction (Usually verticle) it makes for a much cleaner looking install. Its one of those things that most people don't notice or even care about but adjusting them really does make it look a little better.
 

Mike

Senior Member
BraveSirRobbin said:
They have a 360 degree coverage, so I'm thinking it will still work. You may want to browse the Installation Instructions as well.
I think you may be right, but I haven't seen it clearly mentioned. I was looking to hide the sensor as much as possible. Given that even if I have a good spot now, who is to say the furniture or the like will not change, so I'm inclined to just mount the 'boxy' ones high on the wall to ensure coverage both now and in the future.
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
Squintz said:
Sorry I am off topic but I wanted to share a tip with you when installing a wall cover for switches and receptacles. Notice in your second picture of your first post you have a group of light switches. If you simple adjust the screw so that the slots are all facing the same direction (Usually verticle) it makes for a much cleaner looking install. Its one of those things that most people don't notice or even care about but adjusting them really does make it look a little better.
If I see one more post about my screws not being straight... bang, zoom, to the moon!

There are just to many wires back there to get them straight (just not enough room in that box).
 

AutomatedOutlet

Senior Member
For a lot less money than the one mentioned, these are great 25' round sensors that I think look much better - http://www.automatedoutlet.com/product.php...3&cat=97&page=2

t_713.jpg
 

smee

Senior Member
BraveSirRobbin said:
Squintz said:
Sorry I am off topic but I wanted to share a tip with you when installing a wall cover for switches and receptacles. Notice in your second picture of your first post you have a group of light switches. If you simple adjust the screw so that the slots are all facing the same direction (Usually verticle) it makes for a much cleaner looking install. Its one of those things that most people don't notice or even care about but adjusting them really does make it look a little better.
If I see one more post about my screws not being straight... bang, zoom, to the moon!

There are just to many wires back there to get them straight (just not enough room in that box).
Why don't you just get plates that hide the screws? Eliminate the agony of knowing that people don't approve of your screw orientation.
 

Mike

Senior Member
The only issue I've seen with the screwless trim plates is that it often reveals flaws in how the walls around the switch/plug were originally finished (that are now exposed).

I love the way they look though. Be warned, other than that (and that they can be a little tough to add to switchlincs) they have a very clean look.
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
Here is a nice explanation of the proper installation of EOL Resistors and why they are needed from Peter Monahan (copied from another thread):

First a note about End of Line Resistors; they are named because of their placement on the circuit. They should go at the end of line if you desire a supervised circuit.

If the resistor is installed in the panel , then short circuits in the main run on a Normally Closed circuit will never be detected (A window zone that rarely opens for exaple) could be shorted for days, weeks or years without your knowledge and then fail when needed.

This happens more frequently than you would think because of staples and otherwise pinched cables.

Knowing the correct way, you have to make a decision what you'd like to do.

One way to overcome the issue of concealing the resistor at the end of the line is to use the 3/4" press fit switches with a 3/8" magnet. You can bore the hole for the switch deep enough to hold a service loop of wire AND the end of line resistor.

I've never been fan of 3/8" switches because they encourage improper installation of the EOLR.

Always use gel filled connectors, especually on perimeter doors as the single biggest point of failure is where the splices are located; they usually corrode after 1-2 years, building enough resistance to cause run-away troubles.

Normally open circuits are better for motion detectors and of course fire alarm circuits because the panel detects: Normal, Short, Open, & Ground whereas the Normally Closed Circuit really only detects Normal, Open and Ground. In this regard you can monitor the tamper switch of a motion sensor separately from the Alarm Contacts.

If you install the resistor in the panel on a Normally Open Circuit, you effectively have no supervison of field wiring.

Thanks

Peter
 

fleetz

Active Member
Hi BSR,

Could you let me know where you bought your GB International cable tracer from?

Cheers,

Fleetz
 

CollinR

Senior Member
This is a great writetup, I did notice something missing though.

If you use POTS phone to dial up you must do 2 things.

1. Line seizure, the incoming phone lines go directly to the RJ31x jack at the alarm control. From there they go back out to the demarc box and on to the house phones.

2. The RJ31x jack itself, this is an FCC requirement so everyone in the US should abide. The RJ31x jack allows the alarm line seizure as well as all the system to function with the alarm control removed (just unplug it).



Rory (Nassau Security, CCTVForum.com) has provided a good explaination on how this works/should work.

RJ31x installation instructions at Nassau Security.com


If you use anything other then POTS for signaling (Cell only, ethernet only, VoIP) this is not required or needed.

Make note of the DSL filter location! This gets people botched up a lot.
 

norsgamn2

New Member
I apologize if I'm doing this wrong but this is my first time to join in on a discussion like this, but here's my issue.

I have an existing hardwired security system using the round sensors shown in this how to guide. I need to change this sensor on a sliding glass door to the external type shown so that I can mount multiple magnets on the slider to allow the security system to be engaged while the sliding door is in multiple positions (I'm installing a pet door insert). My question is about the "closed" versus "open" circuits on the sensors. How can I easily tell on the existing system which type it uses? I am an amateur with little experience. Thanks.
 

Steve

Senior Member
Welcome to Cocoontech. Most of the time it will be Normally Closed. Do you have any tools like a multimeter (even a cheap one)? Or do you have access to the 'programming' of your alarm panel? Those would be the most sure ways to confirm but if you don't we can get creative with other possibilities. But I'm pretty confident it will be normally closed.
 
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