Icon Relay switch

jeffx

Active Member
The only hole in my Insteon installation left are my PR11 x10 floodlamps. Unfortunately, this curcuit is also a huge x10 blackhole--no x10 signals get in or out.

Has anyone tried using an icon relay switch on a normal non-motion sensing floodlamp tucked into one of the round outdoor external electrical junction boxes? Would I need to provide a layer of weatherproofing on the switch, or should the outdoor jbox be weatherproof enough (caulk the switch seems, etc)? Will this violate any electrical codes?
 

Mike

Senior Member
I'm using the full version Switchlinc V2's for some outdoor ligthing. I think the wattage would be too high for Icon, but these were done before those were out (and are in a room with other Switchlinc's so I would not mix and match them anyway).

They are mounted outdoors, but the work was done by an electrician but was recessed in a box not mounted in a box on top of the outside wall.

EDIT: I misunderstood, the lights are outside, the switches are not
 

eufreka

Active Member
How does the line power run to the lights?

If it is through the attic, can't you "tap" the line indoors and mount the switch in a box? (It doesn't matter that it is an "impractical" switch location...)

Even if it's conduit running up the side of the house outdoors, can you insert a weatherproof switchbox anywhere along the route?
 

upstatemike

Senior Member
Not sure it would fit inside the round box. How about putting a waterproof single gang box next to the floodlight fixture to accommodate the switch? If it is under the eves and you use one of those clear covers designed for outdoor outlets, you should have no problems.
 

Digger

Senior Member
Dont you need to be worried about temperatures as well? In the cold it may not operate and in the heat it may exceed the temperature rating of the components when it is under load.

Although I guess at night when you need the lights it would be cooler and not operating when in direct sunlight etc.

Also Humidity could be a problem.
 

jhimmel

Member
If it is through the attic, can't you "tap" the line indoors and mount the switch in a box? (It doesn't matter that it is an "impractical" switch location...)

That's basically what I did. I have two switches now that are on my 9' high garage ceiling. :)

They are mounted in a regular 2-gang switch box, in the ceiling, complete with cover plate. Looks a little funny, but works perfectly. They control two sets of outdoor lights. They are controlled by indoor keypadlincs, wireless RF X10 motion sensors, and Homeseer. Homeseer uses a W800RF to get the motion signal, apply some logic, and send out Insteon commands. I use the indoor keypadlincs for motion overide (lock lights on or off).

I was lucky that I had enough slack on the wire that I did not need to add another gangbox and a length of wire to acomplish this, but it would not have made it that much harder anyway.

Jim H.
 

Madcodger

Active Member
I had 1200 watts of floodlights going into one switch that I wanted to automate, so I just split the load and power it off two separate switches. To do this easily, however, I had to put one of these in an approved box INSIDE the attic of my garage. As someone mentioned, it doesn't really matter that's it's not easily accessible if you're going to automate it, and you can also link it to a more accessible switch if you're connecting things as I did (i.e., splitting an existing load) of if you have an open spot in a gang box anywhere that's more accessible (even on a different circuit, with Insteon).

I would definitely be wary of Icons for larger loads, though. They are only rated to 300 watts. While there was some debate about whether that was true with early models, I have never wanted to chance it. Saving $20 when your whole house could be at stake just isn't worth it.
 

AutomatedOutlet

Senior Member
I had 1200 watts of floodlights going into one switch that I wanted to automate, so I just split the load and power it off two separate switches.

Be careful, although those switches say 300 watt rating, they probably are really 600 watts. BUT, 600 watts is still too low to constantly handle 600 watts in my opinion. I'd split it up a little more if you can.
 
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