Elk M1G Doorbell

amacphee

Member
I was thinking of integrating my doorbell with my M1G system and I am wondering if the doorbell monitor is necessary or if I can just run power and switch like I do for a motion or glassbreak sensor. $45 for a sensor seems steep but if I need it, I need it. I just wanted to know if anyone else was able to get it working alone.

In case anyone is looking for doorbells, This company makes some pretty cool ones:
http://www.shopspore.com/Spore_True_Alumin...on_p/tdb-al.htm

I am getting the aluminum one with the white lighting. You may ask why I am worried about a $45 sensor if I am spending $56 on a button. That is a good question. ;) I guess I want to make sure I need it. BTW the doorbell sensor has power supplied right? Is it a full replacement for a doorbell system so that I wire the doorbell directly to it?
 

jmark71

Active Member
I was thinking of integrating my doorbell with my M1G system and I am wondering if the doorbell monitor is necessary or if I can just run power and switch like I do for a motion or glassbreak sensor. $45 for a sensor seems steep but if I need it, I need it. I just wanted to know if anyone else was able to get it working alone.

In case anyone is looking for doorbells, This company makes some pretty cool ones:
http://www.shopspore.com/Spore_True_Alumin...on_p/tdb-al.htm

I am getting the aluminum one with the white lighting. You may ask why I am worried about a $45 sensor if I am spending $56 on a button. That is a good question. ;) I guess I want to make sure I need it. BTW the doorbell sensor has power supplied right? Is it a full replacement for a doorbell system so that I wire the doorbell directly to it?

If you do end up needing the doorbell sensor, I've got a spare one you can have for say $20? The package comes with 2 doorbell sensors and a telephone ring sensor, but since I (like most folks) only have one doorbell, I only needed the one sensor... send me a PM if you're interested.
 

cornutt

Active Member
I'm thinking about doing basically the same thing with my OmniPro. And yes, I've had my eye on those Spore doorbell buttons too. :p I'm thinking that they almost certainly have an internal dropping resistor in series with the LED, since they are meant to be wired into conventional doorbell circuits which would not have an external resistor.

I noticed that the Spores seem to have two versions of most of the buttons, and one version of each is listed to operate off of 12-16V DC. That's got me thinking that the internal resistor is in the vicinity of 1K, which would of course be an EOL resistor for a conventional zone. I'm thinking about getting one and measuring it, and if it's right, I'll just connect it my OmniPro as a zone. When the button is pressed, the zone should go not ready, which of course you can trigger a rule on. From what I know of the Elk, it should work the same way. I don't have an actual bell, so eventually when I get my whole-house audio system in, I'm going to have it play a bell sound.
 

AceCannon

Active Member
I wired my LED-illuminated doorbell button directly to an Elk zone, defined it as normally open, fast loop response, non-alarm.

Not only does it work fine, but the button is illuminated.
 

cornutt

Active Member
I wired my LED-illuminated doorbell button directly to an Elk zone, defined it as normally open, fast loop response, non-alarm.

Not only does it work fine, but the button is illuminated.

Good to know. I'm going to give that a try eventually, when I get a line pulled to the front door (don't have one there currently).
 

Lagerhead

Active Member
I was thinking of integrating my doorbell with my M1G system and I am wondering if the doorbell monitor is necessary. . .
One of our clever CT colleagues used a simple window contact installed in the doorbell unit, in proximity to the doorbell solenoid (can't find the original post -_- ). This solution was inexpensive, preserved the original doorbell, and achieved full isolation between the doorbell circuit and the security system.
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
Actually, it was a DS10a that was wired in proximity to the solenoid coil. The magnetic field of the solenoid, when engaged, tripped the DS10a sensor.

HERE is the post (reply number ten down) that also notes this was HiTech's idea over at the HS Forums.
 

Spanky

Senior Member
Coming off the zone input on the M1 is a 2000 ohm resistor going to 12 VDC. The would drive a DC LED door bell button light. Probably the voltage drop at the M1 zone input when the button is pressed is enough to activate the zone.

Do NOT connect an AC doorbell circuit directly to a M1 input.
 

tmbrown97

Senior Member
For me, I had a new A/C driven lighted button (Non LED)... and didn't want the stock doorbell. Luckily doorbell was on the other side of a coat closet.

I looked for a while for a 16VAC relay but after a while got annoyed and gave up. I already had the doorbell detector, so I punched the doorbell itself through to the inside of the closet instead of the hallway; then took off the plates that cause the actual dinging from the doorbell unit (the solenoid still technically activates, just has nothing to contact to create sound). Then hooked in the doorbell detector.

Also - search for the wireless doorbell makers - lots of good sounds out there. I use a westminister type sound most of the year, but change to other seasonal doorbells on occasion. Which reminds me of a key aspect... I integrated an Elk 124 into my system, hooked off some of the built-in voltage-only outputs on the M1 itself; http://www.elkproducts.com/products/elk-124.htm - this lets me program whatever I want to signal; I use it for custom doorbells; custom creepy sounds that activate when you open the door on halloween, etc. Lots of other uses too. My custom sounds play along side the elk sounds through the keypad speakers behind the KP2's.
 

amacphee

Member
Thanks for all of the help guys. It looks like I need to look into some of these solutions. I will take a look at the board for my doorbell to see how it is setup.
 

wanted

Member
Coming off the zone input on the M1 is a 2000 ohm resistor going to 12 VDC. The would drive a DC LED door bell button light. Probably the voltage drop at the M1 zone input when the button is pressed is enough to activate the zone.

Do NOT connect an AC doorbell circuit directly to a M1 input.

Can some one highlight how you would wire the led into the zone input on the M1????

I've just purchased a door bell button which i would like to lit up with an led - just not 100% what resistor is required

Anthony
 

AceCannon

Active Member
Coming off the zone input on the M1 is a 2000 ohm resistor going to 12 VDC. The would drive a DC LED door bell button light. Probably the voltage drop at the M1 zone input when the button is pressed is enough to activate the zone.

Do NOT connect an AC doorbell circuit directly to a M1 input.

Can some one highlight how you would wire the led into the zone input on the M1????

I've just purchased a door bell button which i would like to lit up with an led - just not 100% what resistor is required

Anthony

See post #5 above.
 

apostolakisl

Senior Member
Coming off the zone input on the M1 is a 2000 ohm resistor going to 12 VDC. The would drive a DC LED door bell button light. Probably the voltage drop at the M1 zone input when the button is pressed is enough to activate the zone.

Do NOT connect an AC doorbell circuit directly to a M1 input.

Can some one highlight how you would wire the led into the zone input on the M1????

I've just purchased a door bell button which i would like to lit up with an led - just not 100% what resistor is required

Anthony

See post #5 above.

I think the guy who hooked his doorbell up to the m1 directly used the m1 as the only source of electricity. A doorbell button is just an open/close switch the same as any other contactor in an alarm system. They only trick here is that he is using the elk's 14v output which runs through the switch as the power source to the led. The led is the same thing as having a resister on the line. I see no harm in doing this. Just don't use the powered output from a traditional doorbell that is designed to ring a bell. That could fry some electronics for sure.

Of course the Elk is now the only thing that would know the button is pushed so you would need a rule triggering the Elk to perhaps output a voice message that the button was pushed.

How about "YOYOYO someone's at the doe".
 

AceCannon

Active Member
I think the guy who hooked his doorbell up to the m1 directly used the m1 as the only source of electricity. A doorbell button is just an open/close switch the same as any other contactor in an alarm system. They only trick here is that he is using the elk's 14v output which runs through the switch as the power source to the led. The led is the same thing as having a resister on the line. I see no harm in doing this. Just don't use the powered output from a traditional doorbell that is designed to ring a bell. That could fry some electronics for sure.

Of course the Elk is now the only thing that would know the button is pushed so you would need a rule triggering the Elk to perhaps output a voice message that the button was pushed.

How about "YOYOYO someone's at the doe".

Yep this is exactly what I have done (post #5 in this thread). I made a rule and had it do the 800hz tone a few times with some spaces in between (instead of a verbal thing). When I get around to it, I will have CQC catch the event and play a real doorbell sound (or holiday-appropriate tune, etc). It isn't very high on the priority list right now.
 
Top