More questions about EOLR

dbinaz

Active Member
I have read some threads and still kinda confused as to their purpose. What exactly will they accomplish for me? Do I really need them? I don't know where they would fit into my GRI contacts.

Also, the Elk manual says that temp sensors can only be used on the first 16 zones. Do any of you skip a few zones for something like that and start @ 4 or something?

Thanks,
D
 

rfdesq

Senior Member
dbinaz said:
I have read some threads and still kinda confused as to their purpose. What exactly will they accomplish for me? Do I really need them? I don't know where they would fit into my GRI contacts.

Also, the Elk manual says that temp sensors can only be used on the first 16 zones. Do any of you skip a few zones for something like that and start @ 4 or something?

Thanks,
D
I look at EOL's as another layer of security. With the EOL at the farthest point in the circuit a bad guy trying to short your switch circuit by jumping across the two switch wires closer to the panel will put zero ohms across the circuit and set off the alarm. EOL will also detect another trade who has put a nail through your wire and shorted it, without the EOL the shorted circuit will still show closed but with zero ohms.

I skip many inputs on the main board for just that purpose of temp sensors.
 

WayneW

Senior Member
No, you don't really need them, unless your panel requires them. They are only of moderate value in a typical residential install. You can connect them at the contacts for best results, but people often put them in the panel because it is easier. Having htem at the panel is a blessing if you ever need to change panels.

Sure, you can skip zones all over the place to allow more structure, flexibility and future expansion. No advantage to having them all consecutive, unless it saves you from buying an extra input expander.
 

IVB

Senior Member
I allocated Z1->Z15 for temp & 4wire smoke sensors. All my other stuff is on Z17->Z64 ( may have to buy another expander too).
 

gatchel

Senior Member
IVB said:
I allocated Z1->Z15 for temp & 4wire smoke sensors. All my other stuff is on Z17->Z64 ( may have to buy another expander too).
Thats also how I did my install. The Zone Expander is in another cabinet with a power distribution board in there also. All normal devices come into this panel. I saved the M1 for my Fire zone and temp sensors.


Also, EOLR are called End Of Line Resistors for a reason. If you had to change a panel you could change the resistors in a day. Besides, are there any other panels better than Elk? ;)

Put them at the device so they can do their job.
 

jlehnert

Active Member
where they would fit into my GRI contacts
AT the contact, not IN the contact. :p

You'll find opinions all over the place on EOLs. The "Proper" way to install an alarm is with EOLs, and the "Proper" place for them is at the contact. And the "Proper" speed to do on an interstate is 65 mph. And how many of us actually do that? ;) Do what you are comfortable with.

The chances of the EOL stopping a burglar from bypassing the contacts is slim to none in a residential setting. That would take W-A-Y to much intelligence for most criminals. Chances of an EOL catching when a sub puts a nail through a wire, unfortunetely are pretty good. "Nail goes into wood, not into wire" is W-A-Y too complicated for many subs. :p
 

dbinaz

Active Member
well, i say into because i would want to fit it inside the cap so nothing is exposed. or would it go inline and push the wire back in the hole and connect as normal?
 

Steve

Senior Member
dbinaz said:
well, i say into because i would want to fit it inside the cap so nothing is exposed. or would it go inline and push the wire back in the hole and connect as normal?
GRI does make a mini contact with an embedded EOL. If you really wanted to do it the cleanest and easiest, that is the best way imho. But the negatives are... the contact is a special order and costs alot more than the regular contact and a resistor, if you do ever change panels, you will have to change the whole contact as well. I almost ordered them but at the end decided they simply were not worth it. As stated, there are astronomically small odds a thief will bypass the circuit somehow. It would take extraordinary knowledge and skill. How is the thief to get to the wire to short it before they trip the system (unless you have wiring exposed outside or something). The argument of a contractor or yourself nailing or shorting a wire is very valid, but that is what the test function of your panel is for. How often do you have major work done that could impact the wiring anyway. Just make it a habit to test the system after any potential nail damaging work. If you open the zone and it still shows closed, you know you got a short.
 

rfdesq

Senior Member
Steve said:
Just make it a habit to test the system after any potential nail damaging work.
When there is a sub working, I always put my systems on test with the CS. Then I arm the system while the sub is working in the attic, etc. If he kicks open a wire or shorts one I know immediately and know where he is.
 

CollinR

Senior Member
Use an EOL, in the panel is better then none.

It's also true though nobody will bypass an alarm (from the outside) like that as long as your demarcation box is outside.
 

Steve

Senior Member
CollinR said:
Use an EOL, in the panel is better then none.
I'm sorry, I can not agree with that. An EOL in the panel is WORTHLESS and the only reason they are put there is because of lazy installer who need to put them for panel requirement and don't want to put it at the END of the line where they belong and were designed for. If the EOL is at the panel and a wire is shorted, the panel will not notice it. They are not needed with an M1 because you can configure a zone to not need one which some cheap panels don't let you do.
 

Digger

Senior Member
Also, the Elk manual says that temp sensors can only be used on the first 16 zones. Do any of you skip a few zones for something like that and start @ 4 or something?

I just coughed up $75 for another zone expander while redoing my main cabinet(s) so I could free up my main board zones. If you can do it in the begining it will be easier I can tell you from experience (wasnt so bad but took some time).

I was short on cash when I first did this (and WAF was low) so $500 for the panel alone killed my budget. Beauty is you can always expand this later.
 

Sandpiper

Active Member
Steve said:
An EOL in the panel is WORTHLESS and the only reason they are put there is because of lazy installer who need to put them for panel requirement and don't want to put it at the END of the line where they belong and were designed for.
Steve is 100% correct.
 
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