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New ELK M1 planning - New home

RAL

Senior Member
Nixer said:
Great, thanks guys... now do I need an EOL connector for each of the home run glass breakers and motion detectors?
 
2. Bosch Blue Gen2 motion sensors home run using 22/4 
3. FG-1625 - homerun - 22/4
 
It's your choice as to whether you install EOL resistors on any particular zone.  With the M1, they can be configured on a zone by zone basis.  The advantage of EOLs is that they give you better supervision that the zone is ok.   So if you want to use them, yes, place one EOL on each zone. Best practice is to install them at the sensor on the wire that goes to the NEG side of the zone inputs.
 

Nixer

Member
RAL said:
It's your choice as to whether you install EOL resistors on any particular zone.  With the M1, they can be configured on a zone by zone basis.  The advantage of EOLs is that they give you better supervision that the zone is ok.   So if you want to use them, yes, place one EOL on each zone. Best practice is to install them at the sensor on the wire that goes to the NEG side of the zone inputs.
Cool. I'm installing an EOL resistor in all the motion detectors and glass breakers as you suggested in the previous post.
 

Nixer

Member
RAL said:
 
Elk uses 2.2K EOL resistors on all zones, with the exception of a 2-wire smoke zone.   These are the resistors that come with the M1 and are marked with 3 red bands.  Only one EOL resistor is used per zone, no matter whether you have 1, 2, 3, 4 or any other number of contacts wired up to form the zone.  Note that you don't have to use EOL resistors on burglar zones if you don't want to.  You can configure them on a zone by zone basis.  They provide better supervision of the zone, but require extra work to install them.
 
Below is a diagram of how to wire multiple 4-wire smokes in a proper daisy chain.  Note how the "+" wire uses 2 terminals on each detector.  Be sure to connect the wires using both screws.  Don't just loop it through one screw, or use a pig tail.  Connect one wire to each screw.
 
There are two Elk 2.2k EOL resistors required on the COSMOD4W itself.  Then you also need  a System Sensor 3.9k EOL resistor goes at the end of the daisy chain along with the EOLR-1 relay.   This resistor should come with the COSMOD4W.  There is just the one EOL relay, and it gets connected to the last smoke detector in the chain.  That way, it monitors that power is making it all the way to the end of the chain. If there is power at the last smoke detector, then that's a good indication that all the other smoke detectors are also receiving power.
 
You'll need 2 Elk 924 relays to trigger the smoke and CO inputs on the COSMOD4W.
 
Have you done a current draw calculation on your system to see if you might need an aux power supply?  The 3 smokes plus the COSMOD4W require 195 mA max (combined) in alarm condition, plus another 60mA for each of the relays (120mA total).  The M1 can provide up to 1.0A of power, so whether or not you need an aux power supply will depend on what else the panel is powering, such as keypads, M1XEP, zone expanders, motion detectors, etc.   The numbers can add up pretty fast.
 
Elk has a current draw spreadsheet to help make this simple.
 
The battery that came with the M1 is the back up battery for the M1's power supply.  If you have an aux supply, it would have its own battery.
 
index.php
Hi RAL,
 
I've finally started connecting the sensors. I'm confused about the smoke/co2 sensors wiring. 
Do I need to run 2 FPL wires from ELK panel to COSMOD4W?
 
In the diagram, I see only 4 wires going out to COSMO-4w though but more going in to COSMOD4W. I was thinking I could mount COSMOD4w right next to the 1st sensor but now I may have to install it closer to the panel so it will be easier to run one more wire to it.
Where do the SMOKE and CO TRIGGER outs connect to? 
I'm having trouble understanding how this works.
 
I have 3 home run speaker wires as suggested close to keypad locations for the announcements ...do I connect all 3 wires to OUT1 on the panel or do I need an amplifier? As of now I have just one Elk-73 speaker so any recommendations for the other 2 to get the allowed impedance?
 

RAL

Senior Member
Nixer said:
Hi RAL,
 
I've finally started connecting the sensors. I'm confused about the smoke/co2 sensors wiring. 
Do I need to run 2 FPL wires from ELK panel to COSMOD4W?
 
In the diagram, I see only 4 wires going out to COSMO-4w though but more going in to COSMOD4W. I was thinking I could mount COSMOD4w right next to the 1st sensor but now I may have to install it closer to the panel so it will be easier to run one more wire to it.
Where do the SMOKE and CO TRIGGER outs connect to? 
I'm having trouble understanding how this works.
 
I have 3 home run speaker wires as suggested close to keypad locations for the announcements ...do I connect all 3 wires to OUT1 on the panel or do I need an amplifier? As of now I have just one Elk-73 speaker so any recommendations for the other 2 to get the allowed impedance?
 
You'll need 8 conductors from the M1 to the COSMOD4W.   I'd run two 18-4 FPL cables for this, and put the smoke and CO zone inputs on one cable, and the power and trigger outputs on the other cable.   It's up to you where you locate the COSMOD4W module.  My thinking is to put it near the M1, but it's your choice as to what you prefer.
 
When a detector has an alarm condition, only that one detector will sound an alarm.  To Smoke and CO Triggers are used to make all the detectors sound their alarms in a synchronized manner.  The COSMOD4W will take care of creating a temporal 3 or 4 sound pattern for smoke or CO. 
 
To make this work, wire the trigger inputs on the COSMOD4W  up to two of the M1's voltage outputs.  Then, you'll need some rules on the M1 to activate the appropriate output when an alarm condition is raised.
 
Whenever any fire alarm turns on
  Then Turn Output xxx ON
 
Whenever any fire alarm cuts off
  Then Turn Output xxx OFF
 
Whenever any CO alarm turns on
  Then Turn Output yyy ON
 
Whenever any CO alarm cuts off
  Then Turn Output yyy OFF
 
For the speakers, you'll need to connect all of them to Output 1, or through an amplifier.
 
Another speaker option besides the Elk 73 is the Elk SP12F.  You can mount this with its normal faceplate, or behind a KP2 keypad using the Elk M1BBK2 back box.   This speaker has an impedance of 32 ohms, while the Elk 73 speaker has an impedance of 8 ohms.
 
The M1 works best with an impedance of 4 to 8 ohms. You'll need to use Ohms Law to figure out how to connect multiple speakers in a series/parallel arrangement to get something that is in that range. It's better to come out with a result that is too high rather then too low. 
 
Depending on which speakers you use, how they are arranged in terms of series/parallel wiring, and where they are located, you might not get all of them to be at equal volume (or the volume level you prefer).  In that case, a small, multichannel amplifier might be a better solution so you can adjust each speaker's volume individually.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
--e
 

Nixer

Member
RAL said:
You'll need 8 conductors from the M1 to the COSMOD4W.   I'd run two 18-4 FPL cables for this, and put the smoke and CO zone inputs on one cable, and the power and trigger outputs on the other cable.   It's up to you where you locate the COSMOD4W module.  My thinking is to put it near the M1, but it's your choice as to what you prefer.
 
When a detector has an alarm condition, only that one detector will sound an alarm.  To Smoke and CO Triggers are used to make all the detectors sound their alarms in a synchronized manner.  The COSMOD4W will take care of creating a temporal 3 or 4 sound pattern for smoke or CO. 
 
To make this work, wire the trigger inputs on the COSMOD4W  up to two of the M1's voltage outputs.  Then, you'll need some rules on the M1 to activate the appropriate output when an alarm condition is raised.
 
Whenever any fire alarm turns on
  Then Turn Output xxx ON
 
Whenever any fire alarm cuts off
  Then Turn Output xxx OFF
 
Whenever any CO alarm turns on
  Then Turn Output yyy ON
 
Whenever any CO alarm cuts off
  Then Turn Output yyy OFF
 
For the speakers, you'll need to connect all of them to Output 1, or through an amplifier.
 
Another speaker option besides the Elk 73 is the Elk SP12F.  You can mount this with its normal faceplate, or behind a KP2 keypad using the Elk M1BBK2 back box.   This speaker has an impedance of 32 ohms, while the Elk 73 speaker has an impedance of 8 ohms.
 
The M1 works best with an impedance of 4 to 8 ohms. You'll need to use Ohms Law to figure out how to connect multiple speakers in a series/parallel arrangement to get something that is in that range. It's better to come out with a result that is too high rather then too low. 
 
Depending on which speakers you use, how they are arranged in terms of series/parallel wiring, and where they are located, you might not get all of them to be at equal volume (or the volume level you prefer).  In that case, a small, multichannel amplifier might be a better solution so you can adjust each speaker's volume individually.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
--e
Thank you! It definitely makes more sense now.. I'm gonna place COSMOD4W  next to M1 so it's easier to run an extra cable to it. 
I have 2 out of 3 keypads on M1BBK2 so I guess I have some options there.
 
I've only connect the 16 zones on the M1 now..Next on to connecting 2 expanders. Anything I need to pay attention to? 
You suggested this.
"The M1 can have 2 branches on the data bus, with multiple devices on each branch, all wired as a daisy chain on each branch.  So if you are planning on one branch for keypads and the the other for the M1XINs, that's fine.  Or you could put everything on a single branch, as long as wiring the daisy chain that way makes sense.  E.g. say you wire the M1 to the first M1XIN, then daisy chain to a second M1XIN and then on to the keypads from there.  That would be fine."
 
I have the keypads in daisy chain.... all 3 are working after enrollment. Now I want to add the two expanders.
Would you still suggest wiring M1 to first M1X1N, then daisy chain to second M1X1N and connect the cat6 (keypad) to it?
 
Can I instead connect 1st expander and keypad (cat6) to M1 and daisy chain 2nd M1X1N to 1st?
 

RAL

Senior Member
Nixer said:
Thank you! It definitely makes more sense now.. I'm gonna place COSMOD4W  next to M1 so it's easier to run an extra cable to it. 
I have 2 out of 3 keypads on M1BBK2 so I guess I have some options there.
 
I've only connect the 16 zones on the M1 now..Next on to connecting 2 expanders. Anything I need to pay attention to? 
You suggested this.
"The M1 can have 2 branches on the data bus, with multiple devices on each branch, all wired as a daisy chain on each branch.  So if you are planning on one branch for keypads and the the other for the M1XINs, that's fine.  Or you could put everything on a single branch, as long as wiring the daisy chain that way makes sense.  E.g. say you wire the M1 to the first M1XIN, then daisy chain to a second M1XIN and then on to the keypads from there.  That would be fine."
 
I have the keypads in daisy chain.... all 3 are working after enrollment. Now I want to add the two expanders.
Would you still suggest wiring M1 to first M1X1N, then daisy chain to second M1X1N and connect the cat6 (keypad) to it?
 
Can I instead connect 1st expander and keypad (cat6) to M1 and daisy chain 2nd M1X1N to 1st?
 
You can leave the one daisy chain for the keypads as one branch of the data bus.  Then create a second branch for the input expanders.  You'll  need a terminator on the last keypad and on the last expander.  No terminator on the M1 itself.

Another way to do this would be to have just a single branch.  Start with the M1 going to the first input expander, then on to the next expander.  Then from the last expander continue the daisy chain on to the keypads.  With that, you'll need a terminator on the last keypad and and on the M1 (which is probably where you have the terminators now).
 
I kind of like the first approach, as it makes it a little easier to disconnect one branch or the other if problems come up and you want to isolate things.  But not a big deal either way.
 
You said you have Cat6 going to the keypads.  Did you home run a Cat6 cable to each keypad, and form the daisy chain at the panel by interconnecting the wires from cable to cable, or did you make a true daisy chain with the cables with only a single KP cable coming back to the M1?
 

Nixer

Member
RAL said:
You can leave the one daisy chain for the keypads as one branch of the data bus.  Then create a second branch for the input expanders.  You'll  need a terminator on the last keypad and on the last expander.  No terminator on the M1 itself.

Another way to do this would be to have just a single branch.  Start with the M1 going to the first input expander, then on to the next expander.  Then from the last expander continue the daisy chain on to the keypads.  With that, you'll need a terminator on the last keypad and and on the M1 (which is probably where you have the terminators now).
 
I kind of like the first approach, as it makes it a little easier to disconnect one branch or the other if problems come up and you want to isolate things.  But not a big deal either way.
 
You said you have Cat6 going to the keypads.  Did you home run a Cat6 cable to each keypad, and form the daisy chain at the panel by interconnecting the wires from cable to cable, or did you make a true daisy chain with the cables with only a single KP cable coming back to the M1?
I made a true daisy chain with cat6.. single cable coming back to the M1. I believe I have a terminator on the last keypad already. It's just the jumper setting right?

I like the 1st approach as well. I only have the door and window sensors connected to M1 1-16 zones. The expanders have motion, fire, smoke/co and glass breakers. This gives me the ability to disconnect the expanders when troubleshooting. I know that all my door and window sensors are good but I haven't really tested the motion sensors or glass breakers. Is there any easy way to check it before hooking up to M1?
I checked the resistance value on the door/window sensors to make sure they show 2.2k ohms...but I don't think I can do the same thing with other devices... or could I?
 

RAL

Senior Member
Nixer said:
I made a true daisy chain with cat6.. single cable coming back to the M1. I believe I have a terminator on the last keypad already. It's just the jumper setting right?

I like the 1st approach as well. I only have the door and window sensors connected to M1 1-16 zones. The expanders have motion, fire, smoke/co and glass breakers. This gives me the ability to disconnect the expanders when troubleshooting. I know that all my door and window sensors are good but I haven't really tested the motion sensors or glass breakers. Is there any easy way to check it before hooking up to M1?
I checked the resistance value on the door/window sensors to make sure they show 2.2k ohms...but I don't think I can do the same thing with other devices... or could I?
 
Yes, the terminator is just the jumper setting.
 
You can put EOL resistors on the motion sensors and glass break detectors if you like.  Wire them in the same as you would with a door or window contact.
 
I would connect them up to the zones and then do some testing.  With the motion detectors, you can set the M1 to do a walk test, and then see when they trigger without having to sound an alarm.
 
The glass breaks are more difficult to test.  There are a couple of glass break testers that can assist in this.  Honeywell makes one for their sensors (which also works with Visonic) and GE/Interlogix has one that works with the Sentrol Shatterpro detectors. Both of these testers produce a simulated sound of breaking glass.  But it's customized to the specific characteristics of their sensors.  Don't know if each will work with other brands.
 

apostolakisl

Senior Member
RAL said:
Yes, the terminator is just the jumper setting.
 
You can put EOL resistors on the motion sensors and glass break detectors if you like.  Wire them in the same as you would with a door or window contact.
 
I would connect them up to the zones and then do some testing.  With the motion detectors, you can set the M1 to do a walk test, and then see when they trigger without having to sound an alarm.
 
The glass breaks are more difficult to test.  There are a couple of glass break testers that can assist in this.  Honeywell makes one for their sensors (which also works with Visonic) and GE/Interlogix has one that works with the Sentrol Shatterpro detectors. Both of these testers produce a simulated sound of breaking glass.  But it's customized to the specific characteristics of their sensors.  Don't know if each will work with other brands.
I haven't used glass break sensors in 30 years.  However, back then, you could take a metal bowl full of silverware and give it a good up and down bounce and wammo, off go the glass break detectors. I discovered that by accident opening the silverware drawer a bit aggressively.
 

Nixer

Member
Thanks guys. I've ordered a FG701 to test the glass breakers... I will also try the silverware bowl trick just to see if it still works :)
 
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