quick wiring question about sentrol 5820 glass break

Okay i'm putting in my first security system and wiring up some glass breaks. The sentrol 5820A-W has 4 contacts on it. 2 are called "loop" and the other two are positive and negative. The directions are absolutely no help in understanding which wires should be hooked to where. My guess is that I use the positive and negative terminals to wire back to my elk M1. Is that right? What about the "loop" terminals? What are they for?

Also, do i need to use an EOL on this like I did with my window contacts?

Thanks for helping a newbie.
Kyle
 

programmergeek

Active Member
It gets wired with a 4 wire, wire. Black for - red for + and the other two to the loop, yes you connect a resister to one of the contacts and the wire just think of it as a window switch with power. The black and red are for power the other two wires for the switch.
 
it gets wired with a 4 wire, wire. Black for - red for + and the other two to the loop, yes you connect a resister to one of the contacts and the wire just think of it as a window switch with power. The black and red are for power the other tow wires for the switch.
oh yeah duh it's needs power. I just got done wiring up 70 window contacts so my brain is in 2 wire mode.

awesome thanks bud.
 

felixrosbergen

Senior Member
How do you guys wire in these resistors? Are they just laying out there in the ceiling space exposed?

Isn't there a little bracker or tiny box that you can put the resistor and and then have 2 screw terminals?

I'm new to all this by am very concerned about having to put resistors in all these circuits out the in the ceiling.

I know having the EOL at the panel or in the field is a much discussed issue but it doesnt change the questions. Do you just stick resistors on the M1 or expander board loose?

I would much prefer a little bracket, if you had them near the M1 then you could just have a bank of these nearby the terminations.

Any solutions?
 

BraveSirRobbin

Moderator
The resistor needs to be at the sensor end (thus end of line) or they are useless and not worth even putting in. I myself do not use end of line resistors at all because I don't feel they have much merit in home installations and you actually get better noise immunity without them.

If I were to use EOL resistors, I would solder them in line with the wiring towards the sensor end and use shrink tubing over this assembly.
 

felixrosbergen

Senior Member
Why don't the manufacters not include the resistor within the enlcosure of the sensor. They could easilly sell a 'with EOL' and 'without EOL' version of the different sensors. The space requirement of a little resisto in the sensor enclodure can't possibly be too much right?
 

Steve

Senior Member
George Risk (GRI) actually does. You can get them at Automated Outlet. There are 2 things to know about them, they are alot more expensive, I think at least double a regular contact. Also, if you ever change out your panel, the resistor may not be the same for a new panel. IMHO, I would not bother with EOLs in a typical residential home.
 

felixrosbergen

Senior Member
George Risk (GRI) actually does. You can get them at Automated Outlet. There are 2 things to know about them, they are alot more expensive, I think at least double a regular contact. Also, if you ever change out your panel, the resistor may not be the same for a new panel. IMHO, I would not bother with EOLs in a typical residential home.

Hi Steve, i'm starting to lean that way as well. Most likely all wiring for the sensors will be in the walls, so tampering with the wiring is not likely. And even if somebody had access to the sensor they could easilly 'jumper' out the sensor regardless of the EOL right? Altogether it just seems like to much trouble.

with an ELK, if i choose not to have the EOL in the field then i need to have them in the panel right? If i understand correctly the panel will not 'sense' correctly without an EOL somewhere.
 

Steve

Senior Member
No, in fact thats why you use an EOL, so that you can detect a short, whether intentional or by driving a nail or screw into it during 'projects'. But in order to get to a sensor to even short it, they must already open the window or break the glass, or something that would hopefully trip the alarm. Of course, even with an EOL it is possible to have a really strong magnet to keep the sensor closed. There are sensors are that immune to this magnet trick but they are very expensive. All of this imho is not much to worry about in a typical residence. Most of those thieves are looking for quick and easy and most likely a door will get jimmied or glass broken first. If you have a thief that good, he will get in regardless of what you have.

And no, thats the beauty of the Elk, you can just program the zone to not use EOL. You only see EOLs in the panel when he panel requires it (like most less expensive security panels) or when you have a lazy installer that does not take the time to do it right. My old system had EOLs in the panel and I just tossed them and configed the Elk to normally closed only/no EOL.
 
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