Best methods for mounting components inside an enclosure?

wkearney99 said:
Most likely as a means to reduce squeaks from plastics rubbing together.  Definitely something to be concerned about in a moving vehicle, not so much in a stationary box on the wall at home.  I'd venture it's some sort of fancier textile as plain old cotton or something would have problems holding up with the temperature extremes over the lifetime of the vehicle.
Neither. Old school method called cable lacing. Lost popularity due to cost and time involved, but still done in mission critical (IE: NASA) applications or others where the spec requires a level of workmanship not typically used.
 

NeverDie

Senior Member
I had forgotten about these:
 
cable_mount.jpeg

 
If the adhesive backing is strong enough, I wouldn't have to drill the enclosure.  Maybe just stick a few inside the enclosure immediately above (and below?) where I would want to mount the modules inside the enclosure?
 
Unlike the picture hangers, though, I imagine they'd be attached permanently once the adhesive cures.
 

wkearney99

Senior Member
I can't count the number of times I've been inside equipment and seen those little squares having popped loose due to their adhesive having long since dried out...
 
Well, old school for no other purpose isn't going to get put into anything built for production.  One-offs for NASA, sure.  But I'd venture an automaker has better reasons than that.  Noise avoidance sure seems most likely.
 

NeverDie

Senior Member
wkearney99 said:
I can't count the number of times I've been inside equipment and seen those little squares having popped loose due to their adhesive having long since dried out...
 
Good to know.  I wonder if any are made with VHB tape?  That stuff is comparable to rivets.
 

RAL

Senior Member
Rather than depend on the adhesive on the back of the tie-down squares, I put a small screw through them to make sure they stay in place.   If you don't want to do that, you could  scrape off the foam adhesive tape and use some epoxy for a more permanent bond.
 
Yes, there's a reason for it....it keeps those with improperly set ty-rap guns and similar from overtensioning them and cutting through or girdling the cables. Without knowing the material they're using (IE: nomex, kevlar, etc) then I wouldn't be able to comment further about their other ideas. The main benefit is it allows cabling to be traced without undoing the bundle, assuming there are duplicate colors and codes. You also don't get a larger cross section in the cable or the razor like ends coming out of the lock section. Also very common in fiber optic plants and data centers.
 
In many cases, the big telecoms and others that have cabling brought into harnesses or via ladder racks, it's written into their spec to get rid of door slammers and inexperienced installers. It's more common in infrastructure installations than one would believe...there's a reason why it's brought up instead of ty-raps and velcro.
 
When done right, it's a very nice job and install. I like the running stitch personally. Did that in my own equipment for the coax and category cables....it's not for everyone.
 

NeverDie

Senior Member
The large picture hangers hold up to 4 pounds per strip (not 12 pounds, as I may have said earlier).  Also, the instructions do warn that the adhesive could lose adhesion above 105F.
 
Velcro has some industrial hook and loop products that will maintain adhesion up to 220F.  However, the tradeoff is that they won't be easily removable should that ever be required.
 
Like Velcro, 3M has some dual lock fasteners under its Scotch brand that will work at higher temps.  I've had no luck finding specs on the Scotch website though.  However, it's easier to find and buy than the industrial Velcro.
 
Any other suggestions/recommendations?
 
At the moment I'm still leaning toward the picture hangers.  I'd feel more comfortable if they had a higher temperature rating, but if the adhesive fails I could peel it off without residue and simply start over with stronger measures.  Hard to know, but I may add a freakduino or similar to the enclosure at a later time (it could share the 5volt supply and communicate over the otherwise unused spare Cat6 cable), so the picture hanger's ability to reposition may prove beneficial. 
 
I think Plan B would be the cable hangers with zipties, also because they would leave the devices unsullied in case they ever needed warranty work or if the time came to liquidate them because I was upgrading.
 

RAL

Senior Member
There are also 3M Command strips for outdoor use that are rated for temperatures up to 125 degrees F.  That might be good enough for your purposes. They come in small, medium and large sizes.
 

NeverDie

Senior Member
RAL said:
There are also 3M Command strips for outdoor use that are rated for temperatures up to 125 degrees F.  That might be good enough for your purposes. They come in small, medium and large sizes.
Those would be just the ticket if Command had some outdoor picture hangers.  However, if the indoor picture hanger adhesive fails, maybe they can be upgraded to use the outdoor adhesive refills that you're alluding to:  http://www.command.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/NACommand/Command/Products/Catalog/~/Command-Outdoor-Medium-and-Large-Foam-Strip-Refills?N=3293833399+5924736+3294529207&rt=rud
 
 
Thanks, RAL.  As usual, your posts have great info!   :)
 

tmbrown97

Senior Member
A couple thoughts on this...
 
For attaching inside a little enclosure like that, having a plywood backing is best.  Even the best double-sided tapes seem to eventually fail - especially when they get hot. It may take 2-3 years but even that's too soon.
There is one option - these velcro straps with the hole in the middle specifically for screwing the velcro to the back board then secure the device...  I can't see enough from the picture but the ones I use have a metal grommet that makes it pretty secure. 
 
Another option kinda touched on - these stick on cable tie mounts - they are self adhesive but that only lasts so long - they can also take a screw right into the middle to the backboard then they'll never come off.  I use these under desks sometimes for cleaning up cords and as long as you use the screw they'll never let loose. *Edit - as I read below I saw these posted already along later with the tip about the screw.
 
I've also used that water heater strapping tape from home depot in a pinch - just cut to length and put a screw tight enough on either side to keep devices in the right place. 
 
The Channel Vision bracket is great for adapting regular devices to SMC - I guess it would work OK for just screwing it to a back board using those holes that are intended for push pins.
 
I've tried industrial velcro a few times - if there's no real tension and the surface is clean I've seen it break the device before letting go; but other surfaces or those with even a little tension from wires pulling, and over time they'll definitely come loose; again - may take a year or two, but that's still too soon.
 
I wouldn't go near command strips for an application like this - twisting wires into a box can easily create pull in areas you wouldn't expect - I do these types of boxes all the time with power injectors and I don't deal with anything that isn't a solid physical attachment; I don't ever rely on anything adhesive - and I never lock myself into something that can't be pulled out and maintained.
 
Cable Lacing is regaining popularity.  Especially in data center environments or other sensitive places where people are tired of the jagged edges of cable ties and can't take on the bulk of velcro.  I did some radio upgrades for a large wireless carrier recently (big red logo) - no zip ties allowed - the lacing was an art form in how the wires were stacked and kept in perfect placement then put all together inside the racks - I had to learn a couple new tricks for that - but having used it a handful of times now it's my preferred method.  It's easier to clean up and never leaves a jagged edge; it's not as easy as it should be though to find lacing string - seems to be specialized supply houses.  FYI don't try the junk that cyberguys sells (tried it in a pinch - it's a waste) - it's a flat style that is good for certain applications like looms but not as universal for a lot of the everyday wraps.
 

Neurorad

Senior Member
Buy adapter plates, or a backplane. Made by Channel Vision, Leviton, Legrand, Elk Security, etc.

Industrial Velcro is cheaper.
 

NeverDie

Senior Member
Neurorad said:
Industrial Velcro is cheaper.
 
I'm not disagreeing, but let's take it a step further and get down to brass tacks (so to speak):  which industrial velcro, and where can you get it conveniently in reasonable lengths (i.e. not 100 foot rolls)?  Also, what's the shelf life prior to application?
 
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