terminal block question

v1rtu0s1ty

Senior Member
I didn't install many wires because I know that we can minimize the NEG connections by connecting it to a terminal block, then single wire from the terminal block to the head end location. This is how my wiring is going to be. However, I'm still trying to understand how terminal block's terminal are connected to each other. I still couldn't figure out. I haven't bought anything yet in case you ask.

I also don't know if the attached is the correct terminal block that I need to buy.

For example, I have 15 sensors in 1sf floor. All sensors have each own NEG. That means, I need 15 connections. I want to terminate all sensor's NEG to a terminal block, but just use one wire to M1 from the terminal block. Tons of wire savings.
 

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Digger

Senior Member
If you are looking to hook up multiple motions etc to one output there are several ways. The inexpensive and popular way is to use a block like you have pictured. One side would be commoned together and then attach the devices to the other side.

or

If you are willing to spend a little more Elk, Altronix, Napco, Preferred Power and others sell Power Distribution Modules that allow you to have 4 or 8 outputs etc for one input. The neat feature of these is that each output is fused or protected by a PTC so if one line is shorted it doesnt take down all of the other devices on the other lines.

I went with terminal blocks at first and later started adding the distribution modules when my budget allowed.
 

rfdesq

Senior Member
Neil:

This block will work but you also need a shorting bar. It is a bar that connects all the connectors on one side so it shorts all the connectors together making them common. As the terminal block stands now each pair is isolated from the next one. Make any sense?
 

v1rtu0s1ty

Senior Member
I have actually seen that in Home Depot the other day. The reason I'm so confuse is because of the metal near the head of each screws. Let's do it this way. On the picture, we have 2 long rows and 6 columns(just an example). Looking at each column, you can see a small metal plate that can act as a conductor or continuity to the 2 screws in that column. How do other columns then get the same signal? Are all terminals connected to each other at the bottom?
 

v1rtu0s1ty

Senior Member
rfdesq said:
Neil:

This block will work but you also need a shorting bar. It is a bar that connects all the connectors on one side so it shorts all the connectors together making them common. As the terminal block stands now each pair is isolated from the next one. Make any sense?
Ah, so I was right with my analysis before. They are not connected to each other.
 

Digger

Senior Member
You can common the one side of teh block together with wire rather than buy the shorting block if they are hard to find or cost prohibative.
 

v1rtu0s1ty

Senior Member
Digger said:
You can common the one side of teh block together with wire rather than buy the shorting block if they are hard to find or cost prohibative.
Yeah, I can just undress a wire and hook it up to everyone. Right?
 

v1rtu0s1ty

Senior Member
I guess, we can also use wire connectors(aka wire caps). They come in yellow, blue,etc that is shape like a cone but with an opening on one end then has a metal inside with thread. This is the one we use for connecting ac wiring such as inside an electrical gang box. This would also work right?
 

Steve

Senior Member
I prefer the Euro strips. I will PM a picture to you since I am not ready to share them with the world yet...
 

Snap_75

Member
v1rtu0s1ty

You could use the one pictured and jumper each one as has been said or you might want to look into something like this:

Terminal Blocks

you then would need to get the center connector jumpers:

Jumpers

You can cut the jumpers to any number of poles you want. These terminal blocks do mount to 35mm DIN rail so you need to get that if you think you want to use this.

I use these type of terminal blocks/jumpers all the time and they create a good clean way to connect commons or power to multiple sensors and they use very little enclosure room.

Samer
 

v1rtu0s1ty

Senior Member
Thanks folks for all your inputs! All your help were amazing.

By the way, a friend gave me a 19" equipment rack and it's on its way. :) Do you guys have any idea if our ELK cans be installed on a rack? It's because, most installation I see are wall mounted via a stud.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Neil
 

mustangcoupe

Senior Member
v1rtu0s1ty said:
Thanks folks for all your inputs! All your help were amazing.

By the way, a friend gave me a 19" equipment rack and it's on its way. :) Do you guys have any idea if our ELK cans be installed on a rack? It's because, most installation I see are wall mounted via a stud.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Neil
I beleive the typical can is sized to fit in a 16" stud cavity... youd need to make a mount to fit into the 19" rack
 
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