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What do you do about ceiling fans?

wkearney99

Senior Member
I don't know enough about how the ceiling fans and controllers operate, but my suggestion would be to remove the chain to prevent anyone from accidentally changing it manually in the future.  Perhaps going a step further and taping off the chain to leave a clear indicator that it's not to be used.  You never know what guests or others might decide to try if they don't understand how the circuit it set up.
 

batwater

Active Member
feobrien said:
I went the bond route. Been happy with that solution.and contril via Alexa.
 
Ditto but control with Google.  Works with virtually any fan that has a wireless remote.
 

hgupta1

Active Member
I have a hodge podge of different solutions right now. 
 
I also went the Bond route for the one fan that already had a remote.  I have it tied in with IFTTT   so that when the Ecobee kicks on the heat, the fan starts circulating the air, pushing the warm air down.
 
For the other fans that don't have a remote, I bought these remotes  for zigbee control, but I have not gotten around to installing them yet.   
 
For my fans that have a dedicated switch for light and for fan, I will probably use Lutron's new fan controllers.
 

sionxct

Member
Just replaced a ceiling fan a few months ago. Had no problem finding a traditional AC fan. Maybe some of the high end retailers don't want to show to them to you for a new buid / remodel, because UpSell. But the install base of AC fans is too high for them to not be readiliy available. The only humming I've ever heard from a AC fan is when you use a dimmer to control the speed. If you use a proper speed controller its fine. A proper speed control uses capacitors. The capacitors are normally a generic sealled box mounted in the fan hub. You can get aftermaket versons that are wireless... you replace the the speed controller in the hub with the new unit, and it has a wireless controller for the wall or handheld remote. These come in various styles. I've also seen speed controllers that are controlled by cycling a traditional wall switch to change its mode (light only, low speed, high speed, fan only, etc). Typically the fan circuit uses a 14/3, so one wire for the light and another for the fan so they can be controlled individually. Its not unusual to see a signal circuit, especially if the the fan was a replacement to a stand-alone light. But, even in that case, and aftermarket controller would work. I think insteon sell such as device.
 
This guy has a design for a remote mounted fan controller, if your wiring is capable. This would let you control the fan speed using hardwire:
http://jeditekunum.com/Articles/2017/Automating-Ceiling-Fans-V2/
 

ano

Senior Member
You CAN still find non-remote fans. And I HAVE taken a remote controlled fan and deactivated it so it stays on high. They aren't complex, you can trace out the relays and force it to stay on high. Then you use a controller like the Simply Automated 3 speed fan controller to control it. https://www.amazon.com/Simply-Automated-3-Speed-Controller-Buttons/dp/B00K1HBF6A
I do this for a bedroom fan that has its speeds changed all night. I basically turn the fan higher when the heat turns on (so wife isn't too hot) and I adjust in summer based on room temp. so it fells constant. It works well.
 

LarrylLix

Senior Member
ano said:
You CAN still find non-remote fans. And I HAVE taken a remote controlled fan and deactivated it so it stays on high. They aren't complex, you can trace out the relays and force it to stay on high. Then you use a controller like the Simply Automated 3 speed fan controller to control it. https://www.amazon.com/Simply-Automated-3-Speed-Controller-Buttons/dp/B00K1HBF6A
I do this for a bedroom fan that has its speeds changed all night. I basically turn the fan higher when the heat turns on (so wife isn't too hot) and I adjust in summer based on room temp. so it fells constant. It works well.
What if my wife is never too hot anymore? :)
 

Linwood

Active Member
feobrien said:
I went the bond route. Been happy with that solution.and contril via Alexa.
 
 
batwater said:
Ditto but control with Google.  Works with virtually any fan that has a wireless remote.
 
re "bond"... 
 
How si the range? 
 
I have a fanimation fan that their own remote needs to be about 10' or less away, does not work on the nearest wall.  It's RF not IR.
 
Is the Bond much stronger?   I assume these are send-only, so range is a function (for a given fan) of power of the transmitter? 
 
Can I expect to control fans in other rooms (again, assuming RF)?  Or need a bond for each?   (At $100 or so that's pretty expensive if so). 
 

bbrendon

Member
I had issues in my home where a fan would solve it... but I didn't want an ugly fan and I knew it would only solve the problem in one room. I ended up spinning my wheels and researching more ideas .... I got a whole house fan.  Best $1500 I ever spent. 
 
Back to the beginning... The issue I wanted to solve was a cooling issue.  I didn't want AC for a few reasons.  I think some people have AC _and_ a whole house fan.
 

batwater

Active Member
Linwood said:
re "bond"... 
 
How si the range? 
 
I have a fanimation fan that their own remote needs to be about 10' or less away, does not work on the nearest wall.  It's RF not IR.
 
Is the Bond much stronger?   I assume these are send-only, so range is a function (for a given fan) of power of the transmitter? 
 
Can I expect to control fans in other rooms (again, assuming RF)?  Or need a bond for each?   (At $100 or so that's pretty expensive if so). 
 
My Bond controller is roughly 10' from the ceiling fan I would assume that it has a fairly powerful radio given its function.  I only have 1 Bond, 1 fan in our home.  Unit is send only so yes power is a function of the radio in the Bond.  You should be able to control multiple fans but I don't know this from experience.
 
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