sensors in first floor

rfdesq said:
Page 4 of the M1 installation guide shows the EOL resistors in various circuits.
Thanks for the link. An EOL is similar to the one I used here

irrec2.jpg
 
v1rtu0s1ty said:
EDIT: In order for me to save more wire, some sensors like those in front of the house will no longer be terminated to the m1xin board, but rather, I will just drop the wires because, underneath it is the headend location. I will be saving 40 ft per run if I do this. So, my question is, am I correct that I can still terminate the contact sensors directly to the M1 in the headend location?
I would just concentrate on running it the best way to make your life easier for terminating, troubleshooting, etc. Wire is CHEAP compared to labor - even your own. Your 40 foot savings on 22/2 would save you less than $1.50. I'm not saying what is right or wrong, just not to worry about saving every inch of wire.
 
Steve said:
v1rtu0s1ty said:
EDIT: In order for me to save more wire, some sensors like those in front of the house will no longer be terminated to the m1xin board, but rather, I will just drop the wires because, underneath it is the headend location. I will be saving 40 ft per run if I do this. So, my question is, am I correct that I can still terminate the contact sensors directly to the M1 in the headend location?
I would just concentrate on running it the best way to make your life easier for terminating, troubleshooting, etc. Wire is CHEAP compared to labor - even your own. Your 40 foot savings on 22/2 would save you less than $1.50. I'm not saying what is right or wrong, just not to worry about saving every inch of wire.
Thanks. I will think really hard about it on Friday before I start messing around. By the way, I was at the basement of my new house and I noticed that that installer just nailed all the cat5e and coax to the bottom part of the joist. Is this ok? I was planning to drill 1" holes in every joist. Do you think guys what am doing is a good idea or should I just follow like what the installer did?
 
If you intend to hang drywall on the bottom of the joists, then it is better not to attach your cables to the bottom of them. You can run furring strips perpendicular to the joists to hang the drywall on if necessary if you don't wish to move the cables. If you are going to drill holes in the joists, drill the holes near the center.

If you have engineered I-Joists, find the manual as there are lots of rules for how many holes and where they can be. On my new house, the plumber's recip saw hit the flange on a couple of the I-Joists, and the builder had to send the carpenters back out to sister those joists.

Don't even think about drilling through a glue-lam unless you want to have a structural engineer out to the house ($$$).

And, of course, there is the issue of nailing the cables. If the installer pinched any cables or violated the minimum bend radius, you should invite him back at his expense. I like to wire-tie my cables to a big staple, but even then one must be careful not to pull the wire tie too tight. And the perfectionists would chime in stating the wire tie doesn't have enough bearing area to support Cat 5e without deforming it even if it is loose.
 
Photon said:
If you intend to hang drywall on the bottom of the joists, then it is better not to attach your cables to the bottom of them. You can run furring strips perpendicular to the joists to hang the drywall on if necessary if you don't wish to move the cables. If you are going to drill holes in the joists, drill the holes near the center.
That means, I will have to rip out the cables the guy had installed if I want to put furring strips. Actually, it's tough because all the steel conduit pipes are below the joist. :) I think, I will really have a hard time figuring out how to install a furring strip.

If you have engineered I-Joists, find the manual as there are lots of rules for how many holes and where they can be. On my new house, the plumber's recip saw hit the flange on a couple of the I-Joists, and the builder had to send the carpenters back out to sister those joists.

No engineered joist here. :lol:

Don't even think about drilling through a glue-lam unless you want to have a structural engineer out to the house ($$$).

And, of course, there is the issue of nailing the cables. If the installer pinched any cables or violated the minimum bend radius, you should invite him back at his expense.

He used insulated curved staple. Maybe he has Arrow T59. I'm planning to buy the T25 tonight as it does support curved staple. Do you think this is ok?

I like to wire-tie my cables to a big staple, but even then one must be careful not to pull the wire tie too tight. And the perfectionists would chime in stating the wire tie doesn't have enough bearing area to support Cat 5e without deforming it even if it is loose.

Yep, I saw a video who used wire-tie. He mentioned not to tighten it very much.
 
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